Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some text like this:

qwerty\tberty 
merty\tserty 

I want to grab the text berty between the tab character and end of line. Then to show it worked goto the end of the buffer and insert the text there.

But this code doesn't work. Any ideas why not?

(defun do-test ()
  "tester"
  (interactive)
  (goto-char (point-min))
  (if (search-forward "qwerty" nil t)
     (delete-char 1) ;;delete tab
     (setq myStr (buffer-substring point end-of-line)) ;add text to variable
     ;goto end of buffer and insert text as demonstration it works
     (goto-char (point-max))
     (insert(myStr))
  )
)

EDIT:

Sorry cut and paste error. Should have been:

(if (search-forward "qwerty" nil t)

share|improve this question
    
What is "Option Name" used for? Also, please give an input buffer content and the associated desired output buffer content to understand what the problem is. –  Nicolas Dudebout Apr 12 '13 at 14:34
    
@NicolasDudebout sorry, removed Option Name - should have been qwerty. Example buffer is text above. –  arcomber Apr 12 '13 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are a number of problems in your code:

  1. if takes a first argument which is executed in case the test is positive; all remaining args are executed otherwise (like what would be and else clause in most imperative languages). You can either group all your expressions in a progn form, or use the when form, which takes an arbitrary number of expressions to evaluate if the condition is true, and no else clause.

  2. point and line-end-position are functions, which means you have to call them to get values: e.g (point).

  3. On the other hand, myStr is a variable, which means you can directly insert its value (and you cannot call it like a function)

  4. If you want to keep your original buffer intact, you should move point forward by 1 character instead of deleting the TAB. This can be done using the forward-char command.

Here is a modified version of your function, taking all this into account. Also, I changed "Option Name" to "qwerty" to match your example.

(defun do-test ()
  "tester"
  (interactive)
  (goto-char (point-min))
  (when (search-forward "qwerty" nil t)
      (forward-char 1) ;;skip tab
      ;store text in variable `myStr'
      (setq myStr (buffer-substring (point) (line-end-position)))
      ;goto end of buffer and insert text as demonstration it works
      (goto-char (point-max))
      (insert myStr)))

Please note that using regular expressions could be a better way of achieving your goal:

(defun do-test ()
  (interactive)
  (goto-char (point-min))
  (when (re-search-forward "qwerty\t\\(.*\\)")
    (goto-char (point-max))
    (insert (match-string 1))))
share|improve this answer
    
For some reason the example using regex works but the first example doesn't. First example gives error: Wrong type argument: integer-or-marker-p, nil. Any ideas? –  arcomber Apr 12 '13 at 16:33
    
one more question. the regex works without the two \\ pairs. What is the purpose of the \\ –  arcomber Apr 12 '13 at 17:05
    
You'll find plenty of documentation on emacs regular expressions syntax, for example in the emacs manual. To explain shortly, \(...\) encloses a group in the regular expression, meaning that the substring matched inside this construct can later be retrieved, in this case using (match-string 1). Since the regular expression here is an elisp string, backslashes need to be escaped, which leads to the "\\(...\\)" construct. –  Francesco Apr 12 '13 at 19:54
    
I don't see why the first example doesn't work. You can trace the exact location of the error using M-x toggle-debug-on-error: after this, the debugger will be activated each time an error it thrown, showing you which function didn't get expected arguments. –  Francesco Apr 12 '13 at 19:59

In addition to @Francesco's answer, I'd argue that the logic is quite brittle and it affects the editor's global state. You might consider extracting the parsing into a pure function, along these lines:

(defun extract-matches (str)
  "Extract the last tab-separated value of each line in STR."
  (mapcar (lambda (s) (car (last (split-string s "\t"))))
          (remove-if-not (lambda (s) (string-match-p "\t" s))
                         (split-string str "\n"))))

(defun extract-eol-tsv ()
  "For each line in the buffer, extract the last tab-delimited
phrase and insert it at the end of the buffer."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (goto-char (point-max))
    (dolist (m (extract-matches (buffer-string))) 
      (insert (format "%s\n" m)))

Using pure functions helps keep the interesting logic testable - now, you can verify the finnicky parsing stuff works without modifying your buffer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes I need to learn how to program in the lisp idiom rather than hacking together lisp function in an imperative fashion. –  arcomber Apr 12 '13 at 17:06
    
It helps to use temp buffers whenever you need to do serious text transformations, because many of emacs's built-in string functions modify buffer and editor state. Check out the docs for with-temp-buffer, save-match-data and save-excursion. :) –  Chris Barrett Apr 13 '13 at 0:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.