Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am very new to Java and I am trying to understand some concepts. I have been reading a couple of books but I keep getting stumped around the same place. Look at the following code:

package Grade;
import static java.lang.System.out;
import java.util.*;

public class GradeBook {

private String courseName;

public void setCourseName (String name) {
    courseName = name;

}
public String getCourseName() {
    return courseName;
}

public void Display() // needs a string to run
{
out.println("Welcome to:" + getCourseName() );  
}
}

I'm not sure why setCourseName() needs ( String name ) to be there or where it even gets that value from. If someone could try to explain this in layman terms it will be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Pragnani, Iswanto San, Rachel Gallen, Steven Penny, Lion Apr 13 '13 at 14:42

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Just to hide the variable and not not to have direct access of variable –  Pragnani Apr 12 '13 at 14:52
1  
read about Encapsulation :) –  PermGenError Apr 12 '13 at 14:53
    
You'll find a really good answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1568091/why-use-getters-and-setters –  Nicolas Apr 12 '13 at 14:57
    
The Java tutorial might be helpful: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/methods.html –  iamnotmaynard Apr 12 '13 at 14:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to use getter and setter methods for this class because the courseName field is private; code outside the class cannot access the field directly. Other code that uses the class (usually called client code) would supply the argument value passed to setCourseName and would use the value returned by getCourseName.

With this simple example, it's hard to appreciate why the class would be designed this way. One could just as easily make courseName a public field and let client code manipulate it directly. However, as the class becomes more complicated, using the get/set style offers many advantages. Here are some:

  • Using getter/setter methods helps insulate client code from changes to how the class is implemented. For instance, you might decide later that the course name has some sort of internal structure and you want to keep the pieces of the name in separate fields. You would be able to simply change how setCourseName and getCourseName are implemented and client code would not need to be updated.

  • Automated software generation tools rely on the existence of property getters and setters. With these tools, you can simply model your class as having a "courseName" property and it will generate code that uses the appropriate methods.

  • You might later decide that changing the course name should have certain side effects (such as updating a course catalog somewhere). Implementing these dependencies can be done by modifying the setCourseName method.

With object-oriented programming in general, the default design should be to hide the class implementation as much as possible and expose the class only through methods. There are sometimes good reasons to violate this principle, but adhering to it tends to result in more robust software.

share|improve this answer

Welcome to Object Oriented Programming. Your member variable courseName private and cannot be accessed from outside.

To provide read access to courseName variable you provide a getter method:

public String getCourseName() { ... }

And to provide write access to courseName your provide a setter method:

public void setCourseName (String name) { ... }

Here name is being passed as an argument to setter method which is being used to set value into private variable courseName

share|improve this answer
    
I'm at a loss as to why setCourseName needs the ( String name ) bit. do you mind shedding a bit of light? –  Blank1268 Apr 12 '13 at 15:04
    
@Blank1268: Sorry had to go for some work. As I noted in my answer: About: public void setCourseName (String name) { ... } Here name is being passed as an argument to the setter method which is being used to set value into private variable courseName using this line courseName = name; –  anubhava Apr 12 '13 at 15:26

Gradebook's Story

GradeBook has a secret. It's the private member variable called courseName.

enter image description here

Gradebook: No one touches this variable but me!

Knock, knock. It's the Teacher class.

Teacher: Hey, I found out that you're a GradeBook class, let me assign you a course for today. I suppose you have a courseName variable?

Gradebook: No, I don't! (gulp)

Thinking...Hmmm, how can I keep little my secret but still let her give me that course name? I need that badly.

Gradebook: Okay, you almost got me there. I won't tell you if I have a courseName variable, that's too personal. But you can write down the course in the method setCourseName. Is that okay? I'll handle it from there. :)

Actually...

No one is forcing you to write the setCourseName. Your program will run just fine. You have the option to make courseName public.

public String courseName;

But and it's a big BUT: it's tantamount to putting your diary in the lawn and letting your neighbor, or any passerby, have their way with it. You wouldn't do that right?

Encapsulation, in layman's terms.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's excellent , with a tinge of Head First flavor ;) –  The New Idiot Apr 12 '13 at 15:19
    
Haha! Thanks @noob! Care for an upvote? :) –  Jops Apr 12 '13 at 15:26

This class itself never uses setCourseName but theoretically it could be used to change the private variable courseName.

share|improve this answer

The reason is that you are unable to access the private attribute (courseName) from outside your class. The get and set methods are respectively designed to access (get) and change (set) its value.

share|improve this answer

Please read about encapsulation and data abstraction . Somewhere in that program , someone is instantiating the GradeBook class and then setting its member variables . A sample would be :

package Grade;  
import static java.lang.System.out;
import java.util.*;

class GradeBook {

    private String courseName;

    public void setCourseName (String name) {
       courseName = name;

    }
    public String getCourseName() {
      return courseName;
    }

   public void display()
   {
      out.println("Welcome to:" + getCourseName() );  
   }
}

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] s) {
   // creating instance of GradeBook class
   GradeBook gb = new GradeBook(); 
   // assigning value to the instance variable 'courseName' using setter 
   // as it a private member and cannot be accessed outside the class definition.
   gb.setCourseName("java");
   // calls a public method to display the value.
   gb.display();
}
share|improve this answer

I originally posted a comment. But I decided to post an answer because I believe many are misreading this question.

It looks like you are actually asking about parameters and what they are used for, not about getters, setters, and encapsulation.

I did a few searches and came across this link: http://www.homeandlearn.co.uk/java/java_method_parameters.html

That's a beginner's guide to Java specifically explaining what parameters are in Java.

The methods you write in Java will sometimes need values to complete their tasks. It is likely that you won't want your method to own these variables or inherit these variables, many times you will just want to give a method a variable so it can temporarily use it for a quick task or process then return a value. That is the String name you see in the method definition, it is a parameter, a variable that is passed into the method. You can have as many variables as you like passed into a method. The variables will be assigned in order of the way you defined the method.

For example, if you define:

public void myMethod(String one, String two, String three) {
    some code;
}

And then you call that method like this:

myMethod("one", "two", "three");

Then inside myMethod, you will now be able to use the variables one, two, and three to access those String values.

An example of why you would want to pass in a value instead of having the method have access to it via the class is the java Math class. When you call Math.floor(decimalValue) you want to give the Math class your decimalValue and have the Math class use it to determine the floor then return it to you. You don't want to write your program so that both the Math class and everything else have access to your decimalValue all the time.

Does this explain it all?

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.