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Knowing that every recursive function can be translated to an iterative version. Can someone help me find the iterative version to this pseudo code? I am trying to optimize the code and recursion is clearly not the way to go

sub calc (a, b )
{
    total = 0;
    if(b <= 1) 
        return 1
    if( 2*a > CONST)
        for i IN (1..CONST)
            total += calc(i, b-1) ;
    else
        for j IN (2*a..CONST)
            total += calc(j, b-1) ;
    return total;
}
CONST = 100;
print calc (CONST,2000);

Thanks for the help!

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What is total? Is it defined elsewhere or should it be initialised inside the function body? –  Alex G Apr 12 '13 at 15:17
    
initialised in the body –  Techmonk Apr 12 '13 at 15:19
    
Thanks. Also, perhaps you can provide some sample input and output? The algorithm seems almost like you don't need iteration or recursion but merely a mathematical formula. –  Alex G Apr 12 '13 at 15:24
    
Sample input CONST = 4 a = 4 and b = 5 final answer should be 200 –  Techmonk Apr 12 '13 at 16:05
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A refactoring from recursion to iteration is not the answer to your performance woes here. This algorithm benefits most from caching, in much the same way as the Fibonacci sequence does.

After writing a short test program in F#, with some sample data (CONST = 5, a = 0..10, b = 2..10):

  • The original program took 6.931 seconds
  • The cached version took 0.049 seconds

The solution is to keep a dictionary with a key of tuple(a,b) and look up the values before calculating. here is the algorithm with caching:

dictionary = new Dictionary<tuple(int, int), int>();

sub calc (a, b )
{
    if (dictionary.Contains(tuple(a,b)))
        return dictionary[tuple(a,b)];
    else
    {
        total = 0;
        if(b <= 1) 
            return 1
        if( 2*a > CONST)
            for i IN (1..CONST)
                total += calc(i, b-1);
        else
            for j IN (2*a..CONST)
                total += calc(j, b-1);

        dictionary[tuple(a,b)] = total;
        return total;
    }
}

Edit: just to confirm that it was not the iterative nature of my testing that caused the performance gain, I tried them both again a with a single set of parameters (CONST = 5, a = 6, b = 20).

  • The cached version took 0.034 seconds
  • The original version is still running... (2+ minutes)
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good idea, but i think it will need some improving as ideally looking since we never call the function for the same a,b pair the caching will not help much in this way. –  Techmonk Apr 12 '13 at 16:04
    
@Techmonk You call the function for the same a,b pair a lot, actually. –  JakeP Apr 12 '13 at 16:50
    
you are right! going to implement memory –  Techmonk Apr 14 '13 at 8:19
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Only tail recursive algorithms can be converted to iterative algorithms. Your provided code is most definitely not tail recursive and thus it can't be easily convert to iterative form.

The solution to your performance problems is Memoization

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