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Using SDK 6.1, Xcode 4.6.1, I make a new project Master-Detail iOS App, ARC, no storyboards.

Then in the DetailViewController, in the viewDidLoad I add two UITableViews contained in UIViewControllers and make sure the second one is hidden like this:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    UIViewController *lViewController1 = [[UIViewController alloc] init];
    UITableView *lTableView1 = [[UITableView alloc] initWithFrame: self.view.frame];
    lTableView1.scrollsToTop = YES;
    [lViewController1.view addSubview: lTableView1];
    lTableView1.dataSource = self;
    [self.view addSubview: lViewController1.view];
    [self addChildViewController: lViewController1];

    UIViewController *lViewController2 = [[UIViewController alloc] init];
    UITableView *lTableView2 = [[UITableView alloc] initWithFrame: self.view.frame];
    lTableView2.scrollsToTop = YES;
    [lViewController2.view addSubview: lTableView2];
    lTableView2.dataSource = self;
    [self.view addSubview: lViewController2.view];
    [self addChildViewController: lViewController2];

    // now hide the view in view controller 2
    lViewController2.view.hidden = YES;
}

(I make sure the DetailViewController is a datasource that returns 100 rows of UITableViewCells with the textLabel.text set to @"hello")

The presence of the second view controller makes that scrollsToTop (tapping on the status bar) does not work anymore. If I do not use UIViewController containment and just add two UITableViews and set the second one to be hidden, scrollsToTop does work.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
    
I would guess the Apple code does not check whether a view is hidden when it searches for views that have 'scrollsToTop'. Is there a reason that you use 'hidden' instead of removing/adding the subview(s) to the superview? – fishinear Apr 15 '13 at 10:08
    
It does check. If you don't use view controller containment it works. – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 15 '13 at 11:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

I am currently experimenting with your project. When

lViewController2.view.hidden = YES;

is replaced with

lTableView2.hidden = YES;

then the scrolling works, even with controller containment.

I tried to insert a view between the controller's view and the table and then hide this view, but the table was not scrolling.

I tried to hide the controller by experimenting with shouldAutomaticallyForwardAppearanceMethods but the table was not scrolling.

Result: From my experiments, only one scroll view must be visible in the view hierarchy and the hidden property of the parent views is not checked out. hidden must be set to NO on all other scroll views, not their parent views.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I overlooked so far I guess: the hidden property of the parent views is not checked out. By using view controller containment I added an extra level in the view hierarchy and changed the hidden property of the parent view instead of the table view. I guess Apple could document this better (if it's not a bug). – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 18 '13 at 15:07
    
Nice one – I was using the "hidden scroll view that doesn't even contain its own gesture recognisers, and it simply used to scroll other content" technique, and was getting this issue because I'd hidden it. – Benjohn Jul 3 '14 at 18:30

scrollsToTop only works on a single visible view. From the documentation:

This gesture works on a single visible scroll view; if there are multiple scroll views (for example, a date picker) with this property set, or if the delegate returns NO in scrollViewShouldScrollToTop:, UIScrollView ignores the request. After the scroll view scrolls to the top of the content view, it sends the delegate a scrollViewDidScrollToTop: message.

You could try calling [tableView setContentOffset:CGPointZero animated:YES] on each of your table (or scroll) views manually instead. To do this, implement the scrollViewShouldScrollToTop: method in the UIScrollViewDelegate protocol:

- (BOOL)scrollViewShouldScrollToTop:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
    [lTableView1 setContentOffset:CGPointZero animated:YES];
    [lTableView2 setContentOffset:CGPointZero animated:YES];
    return NO;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is only a single visible scroll view (see last line of the code in viewDidLoad). – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 15 '13 at 9:37
    
Put a downloadable archive on my dropbox: dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/165243/TestScrollsToTop.zip – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 15 '13 at 9:50
    
I assumed you were setting hidden to NO before the scrolling to top event. – Goblin Apr 15 '13 at 21:26
    
Anyway, tried your test project on Xcode 4.6.1 + iOS SDK 6.1 on both the simulator and an iPhone 4, and both approaches you have there work. – Goblin Apr 15 '13 at 21:33
    
Did you look at the Detail View? The Master view works, but the Detail View doesn't. (verified and double checked with my colleague) – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 16 '13 at 7:10

You can only set 1 ScrollView per ViewController with property .scrollsToTop = YES. If you set 2 scrollview.scrollsTopTop = YES, it will simply stop functioning.

ie: your sample project (DetailViewController.m) update following lines,

line48:    lTableView1.scrollsToTop = YES; 
line56:    lTableView2.scrollsToTop = NO;

then, scrollsToTop works correctly. If there are more than 1 scrollview you wish to concurrently setScrollsToTop, keep digging around. good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Except when one of the tableviews is hidden, then they can have both scrollsToTop to YES. Except if you use view controller containment, then it does not work anymore, and that's the question I am seeking an answer to. – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 16 '13 at 11:53
    
you can have it setHidden:, removeFromSuperView or setScrollsToTop:No, as long as only 1 scrollView is set responding to ScrollsToTop: scrolling event. – dklt Apr 16 '13 at 14:41
    
Download the sample code and you'll see that not using view controller containment (put the define VIEW_CONTROLLERS in DetailViewController to 0) there is no problem with having two scrollsToTop table views. – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 16 '13 at 19:24
    
+1 for that life saver solution! – Kemal Can Kaynak Mar 25 '14 at 15:13

After testing several options and various hits and try I finally settled to one final solution, i.e. setBounds: of scrollView (that is tableView in your case) and it works good. You'll have to put extra effort for animation although.

    CGRect frame = scrollView.frame;
    frame.origin.x = 0;
    frame.origin.y = 0;
    [scrollView setBounds:frame];

By the way in your case, try returning YES to

- (BOOL)scrollViewShouldScrollToTop:(UIScrollView *)scrollView;

Although if not defined, assumes YES.

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite sure I understand your answer. Are you suggesting a custom implementation of scrollsToTop? – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 17 '13 at 8:55
    
Yes.. that just a hit..; – rptwsthi Apr 17 '13 at 11:31
    
OK, but in my project that is not an option and neither is it an answer to the question. Thanks though :) – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 17 '13 at 13:34
    
Just to resolve my curiosity. Why that's not an option? – rptwsthi Apr 18 '13 at 4:17
    
I'm asking this question for a bug in an existing project that is in the market and we want to minimise the changes to existing versions. – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 18 '13 at 9:28

I have used this and now it works fine.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
// Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

    UIViewController *lViewController1 = [[UIViewController alloc] init];
    UITableView *lTableView1 = [[UITableView alloc] initWithFrame: self.view.frame];
    lTableView1.scrollsToTop = YES;
    [lViewController1.view addSubview: lTableView1];
    lTableView1.dataSource = self;
    [self.view addSubview: lViewController1.view];
    [self addChildViewController: lViewController1];
    lTableView1.tag=1;

    UIViewController *lViewController2 = [[UIViewController alloc] init];
    UITableView *lTableView2 = [[UITableView alloc] initWithFrame: self.view.frame];
    lTableView2.scrollsToTop = NO;
    [lViewController2.view addSubview: lTableView2];
    lTableView2.dataSource = self;
    [self.view addSubview: lViewController2.view];
    [self addChildViewController: lViewController2];
    lTableView2.tag=2;
    // now hide the view in view controller 2
    lViewController2.view.hidden = YES;

}

- (NSUInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSUInteger)section {
    return 50;
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath      *)indexPath {
    static NSString * const kCellIdentifier = @"MyCell";
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:kCellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:kCellIdentifier];
    }
    cell.textLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"hello %d %d",indexPath.row, tableView.tag];
    return cell;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you're just changing one scrollsToTop property? That's not the answer I was looking for (Sulthan's answer has been accepted in the mean time). – Kristof Van Landschoot Apr 18 '13 at 15:09
    
@KristofVan this will also work. – Divyam shukla Apr 19 '13 at 7:41

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