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I have an array of objects that I want to sort by random. For this case I can use array.shuffle. But what if I want to reproduce that order later on the same array? Is there any way that I can provide a seed, random number, whatever, so that I can reproduce this sequence later?

I want to generate a random list of objects from a MongoDB database (using MongoID), and that list has to be reproduced later. But as far as I know, there is no really good way, to implement a random sort directly in MongoDB. There could be a lot of objects (>1,000,000), but computation time is for the first try not the fact that matters.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you look at the Ruby docs for Array#shuffle you'll see you can pass a Random as the generator; if you pass a new Random to shuffle using the same seed each time, it'll give the same results.

>> arr = %w{John Paul George Ringo}
=> ["John", "Paul", "George", "Ringo"]
>> arr.shuffle(random: Random.new(1))
=> ["Ringo", "John", "George", "Paul"]
>> arr.shuffle(random: Random.new(1))
=> ["Ringo", "John", "George", "Paul"]
>> arr.shuffle(random: Random.new(1))
=> ["Ringo", "John", "George", "Paul"]

Edit: This can be extended to have Array#shuffle produce multiple repeatable shufflings, so that both each individual shuffle and the sequence of shufflings can be repeated, by using one Random (rather than a new one each time) and renewing it with the same seed to repeat:

>> arr = [1, 2, 3, 4] => [1, 2, 3, 4]
>> r = Random.new(17) => #<Random:0x000000017be4d0>
>> arr.shuffle(random: r) => [3, 1, 4, 2]
>> arr.shuffle(random: r) => [1, 3, 2, 4]
>> arr.shuffle(random: r) => [4, 3, 2, 1]
>> r = Random.new(17) => #<Random:0x00000001c60da8>
>> arr.shuffle(random: r) => [3, 1, 4, 2]
>> arr.shuffle(random: r) => [1, 3, 2, 4]
>> arr.shuffle(random: r) => [4, 3, 2, 1]
>> etc.
?> 
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Much nicer than my solution. Use this. –  Joe Pym Apr 12 '13 at 15:21
1  
cool, that looks good. And I like your Beatles example ;) –  23tux Apr 12 '13 at 15:21
1  
Keeping it classy. –  iamnotmaynard Apr 12 '13 at 15:22
    
And is there a difference in the random behaviour if I use Random.new(1) or Random.new(23348594949)? Of course, this gives a different order, but is the size of the number important? And has it to be an integer, or can it be a float? –  23tux Apr 12 '13 at 15:24
1  
That's a different question altogether. Short answer: Size of the seed does matter, and you can pass it a float but it'll truncate it (so 3.14 gives same results as 3). –  iamnotmaynard Apr 12 '13 at 15:29

From looking at the source of the method (http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/Array.html#method-i-shuffle), it looks like it's dropping into the Ruby random number generator to sort.

If it is, you can set the seed with

srand *seed number*

before running the script. I'm not 100% on this though, it seems to work, but I'd certainly write unit tests for it!

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