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My problem is that the more rows I add, the more it takes to retrieve SQL query results. I am not talking about huge number of rows (between 10,000 - 80,000). At the beginning it would take me few milliseconds to retrieve the results from the query, yesterday it would take me up to 3 minutes to display 50 rows, but from today it just max out:

Fatal error: Maximum execution time of 300 seconds exceeded in C:\wamp\apps\phpmyadmin3.5.1\libraries\dbi\mysqli.dbi.lib.php on line 247

Can't find what's it wrong (I'm a SQL newbie). I've been struggling for two months already with this. I have tried all possible solutions I could find on the internet (including here) to speed up the thing and I even made changes the configuration files of hosts, phpMyAdmin, MySQL, httpd.config, iPV6, etc, etc. But since none of this worked I rolled back all changes, created a new database where I added an unique uuid to left join the tables in the database.

But still it's slow as a turtled sloth!!

I'm not sure if it is a problem of PHP, MySQL, the apache local server (WAMPP), or is it a matter of data structure at SQL level (I don't have a Primary Key, nor Unique key, nor index set since I don't know how to use then).

Let me give you some background information of what I am doing and I'm trying to do.

Every day I do several API calls to get the ranking positions for different ads for products and searches from a particular search engine. I use Python to parse the API object, but also to inject the data into a MySQL database.

Each page results has a list of 50 ads of products ordered by their relevance to the search engine. This ranking position changes everyday. Each ranking position list is generated depending on the keyword ('key') used in the search engine. Although each product could change its properties everyday, it will always have the same unique id ('ad_id'). For instance, product ad_id = a001 could show today it has 200 visits more than the previous day, or maybe its seller changed his/her 'alias'.

I generate the uuid string right at the ranking position list (rankings database), from there I attach that uuid to the other databases.

So these are my tables (see link below). I oversimplified for the sake of clarity. The tables show only the first 3 rows, and please note the third row for RANKINGS, ITEMS and USERS shows a different date (that's because everyday I update the database).

http://oi49.tinypic.com/11ceidz.jpg

This is how actually my data structure looks like (based on the oversimplified example):

Rankings

  • c_id int(11), not null, AUTO_INCREMENT
  • ad_id varchar(20), not null
  • rank int(3) not null
  • seller int(20), not null
  • key varchar(30), not null
  • date timestamp, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
  • uuid varchar(36)

Users

  • c_id int(11), not null, AUTO_INCREMENT
  • seller int(20), not null
  • alias varchar(30), not null
  • date timestamp, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
  • uuid varchar(36)

Items

  • c_id int(11), not null, AUTO_INCREMENT
  • ad_id varchar(20), not null
  • title varchar(30), not null
  • subtitle varchar(30), null
  • visits int(11), not null
  • date timestamp, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
  • uuid varchar(36)

And this is my query:

SELECT rankings.key, rankings.rank, items.visits, users.seller, users.alias, rankings.ad_id, items.title, rankings.date

FROM rankings

LEFT JOIN items on rankings.uuid = items.uuid

LEFT JOIN users ON rankings.seller = users.seller

WHERE rankings.key = 'apple'

GROUP BY rankings.date, rankings.rank

What I am doing wrong? Please any help/tip would be fully appreciated! And thanks for you help in advance!

EDIT: If I remove the GROUP BY line and add LIMIT 0, 50 query's results would take just few miliseconds...but with tons of duplicated rows! If Limit 0, 500 = just 4 seconds.

SECOND EDIT: Scorpi0 nailed it!!! See his/her answer below.

share|improve this question
    
If you do not use index on your tables, every simple select will have to read the whole contents of the involved tables. I would suggest you to read some documentation or tutorial about databases, tables and indexes. – jap1968 Apr 12 '13 at 16:14
    
thanks, jap1968! Having said that, do you reckon I will need to redo the database again? Or is it only a matter of adding the index to the tables of my current database? By the way, If I don't use the last line (GROUP BY) the query results come in in just few miliseconds. But with duplicates! – Thanks again. – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 12 '13 at 16:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Wow!

I don't have a Primary Key, nor Unique key, nor index set since I don't know how to use then

Seriously? Then learn !!
With no indexes, the query run in O(n^3) with 3 tables. With indexes, it will run in O(log n).

Just run

CREATE INDEX idxrankginsuuid ON rankings(uuid);
CREATE INDEX idxrankingsseller ON rankings(seller);
CREATE INDEX idxrankingskey ON rankings(key);

CREATE INDEX idxitemsuuid ON items(uuid);

CREATE INDEX idxuserseller ON users(seller);

And you will notice performance increasing.

You can't do SQL without knowing how works primary key and indexes.

share|improve this answer
    
If you are based in London you are in for a treat!!! It works! And yeah, I know I should learn but I didn't had an idea how nor where to start. You see, I'm not a programmer, nor have plans to become one since my field is far from being related to programming (although I learned basic programming with Python quite recently just for the challenge and also to parse my API data). Thanks a million! – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 12 '13 at 17:29
    
P.S. I don't have enough reputation to upvote you. But here it my +1 vote dripped in gold. – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 12 '13 at 17:35
2  
Just remember that when you have "columnName = something" somewhere in your query, then it is almost always a good idea to create an index. – Cyril Gandon Apr 12 '13 at 18:24
    
Good! Thanks a lot again. How freaking unfair is not being able to upvote you. But perhaps that's the idea: to block a total newbie like me from receiving precious help from posters with great reputation like you. – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 13 '13 at 13:24
    
My goodness! I forgot to accept your answer after two years!! Sorry, I think it had to do with the fact that this was my first question ever in StackOverflow (edit: It seems the system let me upvoted your answer again!). – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 25 '15 at 13:10

The server lasts too much for processing the query, since it's not a simple one. You may refine your MySQL query and the structure of your database to try to speed up the process or, if you can't, change the maximum execution time to unlimited of the PHP script by adding set_time_limit(0); on the beginning of the script.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Filipe! By the way, If I don't use the last line (GROUP BY) the query results come in in just few miliseconds. But with duplicates! – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 12 '13 at 16:45
    
Oh, forgot to say..The idea of changing the maximum execution time is good but not enough since after just 6 days it takes 100 seconds. If I try to do it for a year it would take me about 100 minutes in SQL! And in PHP takes many times more! – BringBackCommodore64 Apr 12 '13 at 16:47

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