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I have a number of different databases on a single SQL Server 2008 R2. For arguments sake, let's call them DB_A, DB_B, and DB_C. I've been asked to develop as stored proc that will live on DB_A. This stored proc will be used to drop and create indexes, and also store some extra information about the index in a table on DB_A. When this stored proc is called from DB_C or DB_C, it will be able to drop and create indexes on the calling database, but store the extra information about the index in the table on DB_A.

Here's what I would like to do: I would like the stored proc to be able to get the name of the calling database WITHOUT having to request the database name as a parameter.

Here is a simple example:

USE [DB_A]

CREATE PROC sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom
AS 
BEGIN
      DECLARE @calling_db NVARCHAR(128)
      SET @calling_db = DB_NAME()
      PRINT 'calling database: ' + @calling_db
END

When I execute the stored procedure in DB_A ...

EXEC sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom

...it returns: "calling database: DB_A"

When I execute the stored procedure in DB_B ...

USE DB_B
GO

EXEC DB_A.dbo.sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom

...it returns: "calling database: DB_A".

After reading up on various SQL Server Metadata Functions, this is exactly what it should do. But what I would like is to change the code so that it sets @calling_db to the name of calling database, so that my example stored proc would print: "calling database: DB_B".

Unfortunately, I can't find any Metadata Functions that can do this. Any ideas on how this can be done?

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Very interesting question. Out of curiosity, is there a reason why you don't want to have the process that calls the sproc provide the dbname as a parameter (other than having to support a parameter and provide it)? One thought if there isn't a direct way to do this would be to make the parameter optional @CallingDB NVARCHAR(128) = NULL and check if the value is null. If so, default to use DB_NAME(). Of course, this means the invocation from other databases would need to provide the name... –  Tim Lentine Apr 12 '13 at 16:24
    
The only real reason I don't want to use a parameter is I think that there must be a way to do it, and I hate walking away from a challenge like this without finding a solution. –  Steve Mazer Apr 12 '13 at 16:36
    
FYI, the same question was asked on the DBA site, although it hasn't been answered. The suggestions made were to use extended events, SQL CLR or maintain your own call stack using CONTEXT_INFO. –  Pondlife Apr 12 '13 at 16:53
    
Not sure it this will help or not. But if you prefix your stored procedure name with “sp_” and put it in the master database db_name() will return the name of the database the stored procedure was called from. When you call the stored procedure don’t call it with the database name (i.e. exec master.. sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom) just call exec sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom . –  Durus May 6 '13 at 14:24

1 Answer 1

To make SP run in the context of current connection you need create your SP on master database and make it a system object.

USE MASTER 
GO 

CREATE PROC sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom
AS 
BEGIN
      DECLARE @calling_db NVARCHAR(128)
      SET @calling_db = DB_NAME()
      PRINT 'calling database: ' + @calling_db
END
GO

EXEC sp_ms_marksystemobject 'sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom'
GO

Check how it works:

USE [DB_A]
GO

EXEC sp_WhatDatabaseAmICallingFrom
GO
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