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What's the problem of doing this:

void *educator_func(void *param) {
char *lineE = (char *) malloc (1024);
size_t lenE = 1024;
ssize_t readE;

FILE * fpE;

fpE = fopen(file, "r");

if (fpE == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: couldnt open file\n");
    exit(0);
}

while ((readE = getline(&lineE, &lenE, fpE)) != -1) {
    char *pch2E = (char *) malloc (50);

    pch2E = strtok(lineE, " ");

    free(pch2E);
}

free(lineE);
fclose(fpE);

return NULL;
}

If i remove the line 'pch2E = strtok(lineE, " ");' it works fine...

why cant i do a strtok() there ? I tried with strtok_r() also but no luck, it gives me invalid free (Address 0x422af10 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 1,024 free'd)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code is not doing what you think it is doing... the call to pch2E = strtok(lineE, " "); is replacing the value of pch2E with the return value of strtok which is either lineE or a newly allocated replacement for lineE

You can fix it as follows...

int firstPass = 1;
while ((readE = getline(&lineE, &lenE, fpE)) != -1) 
{
    char* pch2E = strtok( firstPass ? lineE : NULL, " ");
    firstPass = 0;
}

free(lineE);

I should add, the more I look at your code, the more fundamentally flawed it looks to me. You need an inner loop in your code that deals with tokens while the outer loop is loading lines...

while ((readE = getline(&lineE, &lenE, fpE)) != -1) 
{
    char* pch2E;
    int firstPass = 1;

    while( (pch2E = strtok( firstPass ? lineE : NULL, " ")) != NULL )
    {
        firstPass = 0;
        // do something with the pch2E return value
    }
}

free(lineE);
share|improve this answer
    
It should be lenE, not &lenE, we want the size of the buffer, not the address of the variable that holds that number. –  LtWorf Apr 12 '13 at 16:45
    
Wrong. The prototype for getline expects a pointer to the length variable that will be populated as an output from getline –  K Scott Piel Apr 12 '13 at 16:48
    
Oh my bad, i expected it would behave like read/fread –  LtWorf Apr 12 '13 at 16:49
    
No worries... just wanted to be sure there was no confusion there ~smile~ –  K Scott Piel Apr 12 '13 at 16:49

strtok returns a pointer to the token, that is included in the string you have passed, so you can't free it, because it doesn't (always) point to something you've allocated with malloc.

That kind of assignment can't even work in C, if you wanted a function that would copy the token into a buffer, it would be something like this:

tokenize(char* string, char* delimiter, char* token);

And you would need to pass a valid pointer to token, for the function to copy the data in. In C to copy the data in the pointer, the function needs access to that pointer so it would be impossible for a function to do it on a return value.

An alternative strategy for that (but worst) would be a function that allocates memory internally and returns a pointer to a memory area that needs to be freed by the caller.

For your problem, strtok needs to be called several times to return all the tokens, until it returns null, so it should be:

while ((readE = getline(&lineE, &lenE, fpE)) != -1) {
    char *pch2E;

    pch2E = strtok(lineE, " "); //1st token

    while ((pch2E = strtok(NULL, " ")) != NULL) {
        //Do something with the token
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your length argument to getline is wrong. See the man page for getline -- the prototype is ssize_t getline(char **lineptr, size_t *n, FILE *stream); –  K Scott Piel Apr 12 '13 at 16:49
    
Thanks, i fixed it. –  LtWorf Apr 12 '13 at 16:49
1  
In addition -- note that strtok expects you to pass it a NULL as the first argument when you are re-parsing a line. Passing in lineE every time will restart the parse at the top of the string every time -- strtok is a globally stateful function (thus the alternate strtok_r) –  K Scott Piel Apr 12 '13 at 16:51

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