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In a ListView of sound files in a folder I want to show the length in seconds of the files. The steps that I take:

  1. First I create an ArrayList for the instances of the soundFiles.
  2. Then in a for loop I add the data to the instance by soundFile.setLength(calculateLength(file[i])).
  3. After this I initiate my CustomArrayAdapter and I apply it to my listView.
  4. In my CustomArrayAdapter I apply it: tvFileLength.setText(soundFile.getLength()); (whith a holder though..)

But since I am doing this, my app is slower than a turtle! (having 400 files) Is there any way I can fix this speed?

private int calculateLength(File yourFile)
            throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalStateException, IOException {
        MediaPlayer mp = new MediaPlayer();
        FileInputStream fs;
        FileDescriptor fd;
        fs = new FileInputStream(yourFile);
        fd = fs.getFD();
        mp.setDataSource(fd);
        mp.prepare(); 
        int length = mp.getDuration();
        length = length / 1000;
        mp.release();
        return length;

    }

   **EDIT**

New code I am having:

Activity

myList = new ArrayList<RecordedFile>();

        File directory = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory();
        file = new File(directory + "/test/");

        File list[] = file.listFiles();

        for (int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
            if (checkExtension(list[i].getName()) == true) {

                RecordedFile q = new RecordedFile();
                q.setTitle(list[i].getName());
                q.setFileSize(readableFileSize(list[i].length()));
                            //above is the size in kB, is something else but I 
                            //also might move this to the AsyncTask!


                myList.add(q);
            }
        }
        new GetAudioFilesLength(myList).execute();

AsyncTask

List<RecordedFile> mFiles = new ArrayList<RecordedFile>();

    public GetAudioFilesLength(List<RecordedFile> theFiles) {
        mFiles = theFiles;
    }

    @Override
    protected String doInBackground(Void... params) {

        File directory = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory();
        // File file = new File(directory + "/test/");
        String mid = "/test/";

        for (RecordedFile fileIn : mFiles) {

            File file = new File(directory + mid + fileIn.getTitle());
            try {
                int length = readableFileLengthSeconds(file);
                fileIn.setFileLengthSeconds(length);
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalStateException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            // Do something with the length


            // You might want to update the UI with the length of this file
            // with onProgressUpdate so that you display the length of the files
            // in real time as you process them.
        }
        return mid;

    }

    @Override
    protected void onProgressUpdate(Void... values) {

    }

    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
        // Update the UI in any way you want. You might want
        // to store the file lengths somewhere and then update the UI
        // with them here
    }

    /*
     * @Override protected void onPreExecute() { }
     */

    public int readableFileLengthSeconds(File yourFile)
            throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalStateException, IOException {
        MediaPlayer mp = new MediaPlayer();
        FileInputStream fs;
        FileDescriptor fd;
        fs = new FileInputStream(yourFile);
        fd = fs.getFD();
        mp.setDataSource(fd);
        mp.prepare(); // might be optional
        int length = mp.getDuration();
        length = length / 1000;
        mp.release();
        return length;

    }

Awesome, it works partly, but! I got 2 remaining questions:

  1. Does this looks ok and efficient?
  2. It works for lets say the first 100 elements in my listview, after that it displays 0 s, it has something to do with onProgressUpdate I assume, but I am not sure how I can make this work.
share|improve this question

Reading the files in so that MediaPlayer can find the duration is clearly taking some time. Since you are running this on the UI thread, that's going to slow down the entire application.

I don't have any suggestions for how to speed up the process, but you can make your application behave much more smoothly if you do this work in a background thread with AsyncTask. That might look something like this:

private class GetAudioFilesLength extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {

      List<File> mFiles = new ArrayList<File>();

      public GetAudioFilesLength(List<File> theFiles){
           mFiles = theFiles;
      }

      @Override
      protected String doInBackground(String... params) {
            for(File file : mFiles){
                int length = calculateLength(file);
                // Do something with the length

                // You might want to update the UI with the length of this file
                // with onProgressUpdate so that you display the length of the files
                // in real time as you process them.
            }
      }      

      @Override
      protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
            // Update the UI in any way you want. You might want
            // to store the file lengths somewhere and then update the UI
            // with them here
      }

      @Override
      protected void onPreExecute() {
      }

      @Override
      protected void onProgressUpdate(Void... values) {
      }
}   

When you want to start the processing, just call new GetAudioFilesLength(files).execute()

Edit to answer additional questions:

  1. It looks as efficient as your original code. The difference now is that the user will still be able to interact with your application because the work will be done in the background thread. It is possible that there is a more efficient way to read in the length of an audio file, but I don't know what that is. If you knew the sample rate and encoding, I can imagine you could write code that would calculate the length of the audio without loading it into MediaPlayer, which takes longer. Again, though, someone else would have to help with that.

  2. I'm not sure I understand what the problem is, but I think you are asking how to use onProgressUpdate to update the UI and add the lengths to a ListView?

You could change the middle argument to the AsyncTask generation to be a String (or something else) AsyncTask<Void, String, Void>, that tells onProgressUpdate what you will be passing to it. You can then callpublishProgress` from doInBackground to update the UI accordingly.

@Override
  protected String doInBackground(Void... params) {
        for(File file : mFiles){
            int length = calculateLength(file);
            // Do something with the length

            // You might want to update the UI with the length of this file
            // with onProgressUpdate so that you display the length of the files
            // in real time as you process them.
            publishProgress("The length of " + file.getName() + " is: " + length);
        }
  }      

  @Override
  protected void onPostExecute(Void result) {
        // Update the UI in any way you want. You might want
        // to store the file lengths somewhere and then update the UI
        // with them here
  }

  @Override
  protected void onProgressUpdate(String... values) {
        // You'll have to implement whatever you'd like to do with this string on the UI
        doSomethingWithListView(values[0]);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @mattgmg1990, I will try this this evening or tommorrow and get back to you! – Jack Commonw Apr 12 '13 at 17:16
    
No problem, let me know how it goes! – mattgmg1990 Apr 12 '13 at 17:56
1  
No problemo! I just added my answers to your questions. – mattgmg1990 Apr 12 '13 at 20:54
1  
That sounds right, when you're scrolling down and you get to files that have not yet had their length set, they will be 0, that's because the AsyncTask is still working and hasn't gotten to them yet. When you scroll back up and down again at a later time, after their lengths have been set, the TextView will be updated with the new value. Unless you can speed up the processing of the files (like I said before, I'm not sure how), you can't really improve that. Instead, maybe show a message instead of 0 until it is ready, like "calculating size..." – mattgmg1990 Apr 13 '13 at 13:52
1  
@JackCommonw It definitely would be, I was thinking that you would build that into onProgressUpdate. You could pass the file that you've calculated the length for into onProgressUpdate, use it to find the ListItem that you want to update, and set the TextView to display the length. – mattgmg1990 Apr 14 '13 at 14:28

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