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I want to find mean of standard normal distribution in a given interval.

For example, if I divide standard normal distribution into two ([-Inf:0] [0:Inf]) I want to get the mean of each half.

Following code does almost exactly what I want:

divide <- 2
boundaries <- qnorm(seq(0,1,length.out=divide+1))
t <- sort(rnorm(100000))
means.1 <- rep(NA,divide)
for (i in 1:divide) {
    means.1[i] <- mean(t[(t>boundaries[i])&(t<boundaries[i+1])])
  }    

But I need a more precise (and elegant) method to calculate these numbers (means.1).

I tried the following code but it did not work (maybe because of the lack of my probability knowledge).

divide <- 2
boundaries <- qnorm(seq(0,1,length.out=divide+1))
means.2 <- rep(NA,divide)
f <- function(x) {x*dnorm(x)}
for (i in 1:divide) {
  means.2[i] <- integrate(f,lower=boundaries[i],upper=boundaries[i+1])$value
}    

Any ideas? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Just added a second answer -- a one-liner which takes an entirely different approach. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 19 '13 at 16:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that the integral of dnorm(x) in the interval (-Inf to 0) isn't 1, that's why you got the wrong answer. To correct you must divide the result you got by 0.5 (the integral result). Like:

func <- function(x, ...) x * dnorm(x, ...)
integrate(func, -Inf, 0, mean=0, sd=1)$value / (pnorm(0, mean=0, sd=1) - pnorm(-Inf, mean=0, sd=1)) 

Adapt it to differents intervals should be easy.

share|improve this answer
    
if it has a short answer can you explain why you put "..." within function. i.e. why "function(x, ...)" but not "function(x)" –  HBat Apr 12 '13 at 20:51
1  
@HBat ... lets you pass arguments through one function to another. In this example, the ... lets Rcoster specify mean and sd when calling func even though they're not named in the the definition. The just get passed on to dnorm (where they are named). –  Gregor Apr 12 '13 at 23:11
    
Got it. Thanks. –  HBat Apr 15 '13 at 20:44

You can use a combination of fitdistr and vector indexing.

Here's an example of how to get mean and std of just the positive values:

library("MASS")
x = rnorm(10000)
fitdistr(x[x > 0], densfun="normal")

or just the values in the interval (0,2):

fitdistr(x[x > 0 & x < 2], densfun="normal")
share|improve this answer
    
Which, happily, does agree w/ DWin's approach :-) –  Carl Witthoft Apr 12 '13 at 20:20

Thanks for answering my question.

I combined all answers as I understand:

    divide <- 5
    boundaries <- qnorm(seq(0,1,length.out=divide+1))
# My original thinking        
    t <- sort(rnorm(1e6))
    means.1 <- rep(NA,divide)
    for (i in 1:divide) {
        means.1[i] <- mean(t[((t>boundaries[i])&(t<boundaries[i+1]))])
      }    

# Based on @DWin
    t <- sort(rnorm(1e6))
    means.2 <- tapply(t, findInterval(t, boundaries), mean)

# Based on @Rcoster
    means.3 <- rep(NA,divide)
    f <- function(x, ...) x * dnorm(x, ...)
    for (i in 1:divide) {
      means.3[i] <- integrate(f, boundaries[i], boundaries[i+1])$value / (pnorm(boundaries[i+1]) - pnorm(boundaries[i]))
    }   

# Based on @Kith
    t <- sort(rnorm(1e6))
    means.4 <- rep(NA,divide)    
    for (i in 1:divide) {
      means.4[i] <- fitdistr(t[t > boundaries[i] & t < boundaries[i+1]], densfun="normal")$estimate[1]
    }    

Results

>   means.1
[1] -1.4004895486 -0.5323784986 -0.0002590746  0.5313539906  1.3978177100
>   means.2   
[1] -1.3993590768 -0.5329465789 -0.0002875593  0.5321381745  1.3990997391 
>   means.3
[1] -1.399810e+00 -5.319031e-01  1.389222e-16  5.319031e-01  1.399810e+00
>   means.4
[1] -1.399057073 -0.531946615 -0.000250952  0.531615180  1.400086731

I believe @Rcoster is the one that I wanted. Rest is innovative approaches compared to mine but still approximate. Thanks.

share|improve this answer

Let's say your cutpoints are -1, 0, 1, and 2 and you are interested in the mean of sections simulating a standard Normal.

 samp <-   rnorm(1e5)
 (res <- tapply(samp, findInterval(samp, c( -1, 0, 1, 2)), mean) )
#         0          1          2          3          4 
#-1.5164151 -0.4585519  0.4608587  1.3836470  2.3824633 

Please do note that the labeling could be improved. One improvement could be:

names(res) <-  paste("[", c(-Inf, -1, 0, 1, 2, Inf)[-6],  " , ", 
                      c(-Inf, -1, 0, 1, 2, Inf)[-1], ")", sep="")
> res
[-Inf , -1)    [-1 , 0)     [0 , 1)     [1 , 2)   [2 , Inf) 
 -1.5278185  -0.4623743   0.4621885   1.3834442   2.3835116 
share|improve this answer
    
Appears to disagree w/ @Josh solution? –  Carl Witthoft Apr 12 '13 at 19:10
    
@Carl -- I trust simulation results more than what I came up with, so have deleted my answer. Haven't figured out why evaluating points at regular quantile-intervals doesn't work, though. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 12 '13 at 19:33
    
Color me amused. It does Josh credit that he respects the data more than the theory. It does seem that the value of 0.423 is not in the credible range of values when this method is applied repeatedly to samples of 1e5 size for the range [0,1). True value is 0.4598622. –  BondedDust Apr 12 '13 at 21:18
    
@DWin -- Thanks for the kind words. Walking home, I figured out my earlier mistake, and have corrected the post. It's great having so many eyeballs scrutinizing ideas that get posted here. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 13 '13 at 2:27

Using the distrEx and distr packages:

library(distrEx)
E(Truncate(Norm(mean=0, sd=1), lower=0, upper=Inf))
# [1] 0.797884

(See vignette(distr) in the distrDoc package for an excellent overview of the suite of distr and related packages.)


Or, using just base R, here's an alternative that constructs a discrete approximation of the expectation within the interval between lb and ub. The bases of the approximating rectangles are adjusted so that they all have equal areas (i.e. so that the probability of a point falling in each one of them is identical).

intervalMean <- function(lb, ub, n=1e5, ...) {
    ## Get x-values at n evenly-spaced quantiles between lower and upper bounds
    xx <- qnorm(seq(pnorm(lb, ...), pnorm(ub, ...), length = n), ...)
    ## Calculate expectation
    mean(xx[is.finite(xx)])
}

## Your example
intervalMean(lb=0, ub=1)
# [1] 0.4598626

## The mean of the complete normal distribution
intervalMean(-Inf, Inf)
## [1] -6.141351e-17

## Right half of standard normal distribution
intervalMean(lb=0, ub=Inf)
# [1] 0.7978606

## Right half of normal distribution with mean 0 and standard deviation 100
intervalMean(lb=0, ub=Inf, mean=0, sd=100)
# [1] 79.78606
share|improve this answer
    
@CarlWitthoft -- Check out the bounds in that last call: right half of a normal distribution with standard deviation 100 should have an expectation 100 times that of the right half of a standard normal distribution. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 12 '13 at 18:58
    
OK, here's my confusion. We're calculating the value of x which corresponds to the mean value of the interval. The most likely value of x over -Inf,Inf is zero. But that's not the mean value of the distribution itself ("y= exp(x^2/sigma^2)). –  Carl Witthoft Apr 12 '13 at 19:08
    
@CarlWitthoft -- Does this image, from Wikipedia's 'expected value' page, help? When we look at just the right half of a (standard) normal distribution, the fulcrum point is at a positive value. When we look at just the left half, the fulcrum point will be a negative value (of the same magnitude). –  Josh O'Brien Apr 12 '13 at 19:10
    
@CarlWitthoft -- OK, I've fixed it now, and uncloaked it in case you (or anyone else) is interested. My earlier proposed solution had been systematically underweighting the contribution of the tails. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 13 '13 at 2:23

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