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I'm working with a project that implements a function in assembly that is called in a main.c. The signature function declaration in C is void strrev(char *str) ; The Ret instruction is giving me an illegal instruction error. Why? This is my first time doing this.

Trying to only post the relevant code:

SECTION .text
        global strrev

strrev:
        push    ebp
        mov     ebp, esp

        push    esi
        push    edi
        push    ebx

// doing things with al, bl, ecx, edi, and esi registers here


// restore registers and return    
        mov     esp,    ebp
        pop     ebx
        pop     edi
        pop     esi
        pop     ebp

        ret

Error:

(gdb)
Program received signal SIGILL, Illegal instruction.
0xbffff49a in ?? ()

Compiling and linking this way:

nasm -f elf -g strrepl.asm
nasm -f elf -g strrev.asm
gcc -Wall -g -c main7.c
gcc -Wall -g strrepl.o strrev.o main7.o
share|improve this question
1  
Watch carefully in the debugger what is being popped and where you are returning to. – Raymond Chen Apr 12 '13 at 17:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

mov esp, ebp changes esp to point to where it was when mov ebp, esp was executed. That was before you pushed esi, edi, and ebx onto the stack, so you can no longer pop them. Since you do, the stack is wrong, and the ret does not work as desired.

You can likely delete the mov esp, ebp instruction. Restoring the stack pointer like that is needed only if you have variable changes to the stack pointer in the routine (e.g., to move the stack to a desired alignment or to make space for a variable-length array). If your stack is handled simply, then you merely pop in reverse order of what you push. If you do have variable changes to the stack, then you need to restore the pointer to a different location, not the ebp you have saved, so that you can pop ebx, edi, and esi.

share|improve this answer
    
Gotcha, makes sense I think. I'll look at this further when I'm back home. – b15 Apr 12 '13 at 18:14
    
Now it got past the return, but when the main.c program goes to print the strings that I reversed, it prints empty strings – b15 Apr 12 '13 at 19:30

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