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I have the batch script below. It should read the first character of every line of a text file. Is that is a to z, it should make a subfolder in the corresponding folder. It is somethins else, it should be created in the "_other" folder.

So if i have a list:

123test
aaatest
bbbtest

It should create:

c:\dirs\_other\123test
c:\dirs\a\aaatest
c:\dirs\b\bbbtest

But for some reason my last if/else does not work. Why not? this is the script:

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set file=c:\klantenlijst.txt
FOR /F "delims=~" %%i IN (!file!) DO (
set var=%%i 
set str=!var:~0,1!
IF !str!==A ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==B ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==C ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==D ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==E ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==F ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==G ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==H ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==I ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==J ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==K ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==L ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==M ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==N ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==O ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==P ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==Q ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==R ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==S ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==T ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==U ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==V ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==W ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==X ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==Y ( set letter=1 )
IF !str!==Z ( set letter=1 )

IF !letter!==1 ( md c:\Dirs\!str!\!var! ) ELSE ( md c:\Dirs\_Other\!var! )

)
share|improve this question
    
post file klantenlijst.txt –  Endoro Apr 12 '13 at 19:18
    
It contains for testing just 4 records. All 0-9,a-z,A-Z and spaces –  Mbrouwer88 Apr 12 '13 at 20:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is another quick way to verify whether a character is a letter.

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set file=c:\klantenlijst.txt
for /f "delims=" %%i IN (%file%) do (
   set var=%%i
   set str=!var:~0,1!
   if /i "!str!" geq "A" if /i "!str!" leq "Z" set "str=_other"
   md "c:\dirs\!str!\!var!"
)

One difference with this approach is that non-English letters with diacriticals will also be counted as letters. These non-English letters all have extended ASCII codes greater than 127. This is the same result that Andriy's FINDSTR method gets.

share|improve this answer
    
When you said "the above approach", you meant @Aacini's, right? For I can't see how your suggestion's results would be different to mine's. –  Andriy M Apr 13 '13 at 13:39
    
@AndriyM - By above, I meant the approach in my answer - a poor choice of words. I believe our approaches give the same result, yes. –  dbenham Apr 13 '13 at 14:57
    
Ah, I see, I believe my perception was slanted somehow, even though I myself often use the word "above" to refer to parts of text in my own posts. A double lesson for me. Perhaps you didn't need to change the wording because of me, but thank you very much for jumping to it! –  Andriy M Apr 13 '13 at 16:37

This is the way I would do it:

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set letters=ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
set file=c:\klantenlijst.txt
FOR /F "delims=" %%i IN (%file%) DO (
   set var=%%i
   set str=!var:~0,1!
   for %%a in ("!str!") do if "!letters:%%~a=!" equ "%letters%" set str=_other
   md "c:\dirs\!str!\!var!"
)

The program above tries to delete the first character from a string comprised of all the letters; if the result is the same, then the first character is NOT a letter. This method is faster because it does not use any external .exe command.

EDIT: Some explanations added

In next examples below I write first a command and then its output.

The letters variable contain the 26 letters, that is:

echo !letters!
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Batch allows to replace part of a variable value this way:

echo !letters:M=123!
ABCDEFGHIJKL123NOPQRSTUVWXYZ

If the replacement string is not given, the original substring is just deleted:

echo !letters:M=!
ABCDEFGHIJKLNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

If the original substring is contained in another variable, the replacement is achieved with its value. For example, if the variable have a letter:

set str=M
echo !letters:%str%=!
ABCDEFGHIJKLNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

On the other hand, if the variable have NOT a letter, the new value remains the same as the original:

set str=1
echo !letters:%str%=!
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

This way, if you compare "!letters:%str%=!" versus "%letters%"; if the result is DIFFERENT, then str variable contain a letter; otherwise str variable contain a non-alphabetic character.

However, you must note that str variable is modified inside a FOR loop. This means that its value must be replaced using DelayedExpansion, but this result in the following funny code: "!letters:!str!=!" that, of course, is invalid. The way to fix this detail is changing !str! value by a FOR replaceable parameter and then use the parameter in the replace substring expression.

You must note that previous replacement is achieved by cmd.exe processor immediately as the normal processing of the Batch file. On the other hand, the execution of ECHO !str! | FINDSTR /I "[A-Z]" requires the loading of FINDSTR.EXE file (about 30 KB size) and the execution of two copies of CMD.EXE in order to execute each side of the pipeline, and this process is executed for each name in the list!. This mean that this method is much slower than the former one, and the timing difference will be evident if the list of names is large.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean 'The script above tries' ? I had a bit of trouble understanding it :) –  user2033427 Apr 13 '13 at 0:32
    
@user2033427: I added some explanations to my answer... –  Aacini Apr 13 '13 at 1:48
    
+1, But the MD path should be quoted in case of spaces. –  dbenham Apr 13 '13 at 1:52
1  
@Endoro: For lower case: echo "!letters:m=!"="ABCDEFGHIJKLNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"; if "ABCDEFGHIJKLNOPQRSTUVWXYZ" equ "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ". The if compare "%letters%" versus itself without one letter, so the /i option is not needed even if the deleted letter is lower case. –  Aacini Apr 13 '13 at 13:05
1  
@Endoro: String replacement is unconditionally case-insensitive (at least as long as the system is case-insensitive, I guess), if that's what you were asking about. –  Andriy M Apr 13 '13 at 13:48

You can use FINDSTR to test if the first character is a letter:

...
ECHO !str! | FINDSTR /I "[A-Z]" 1>NUL && (
  command to execute if !str! is a letter
) || (
  command to execute if !str! is not a letter
)
...

The "[A-Z]" pattern matches any letter and the /I switch makes the matching case-insensitive.

For instance, you could set str to _other if it is not a letter. That way you would not need any more conditions when using the value as the name of the folder in which the subfolder should be created:

...
ECHO !str! | FINDSTR /I "[A-Z]" 1>NUL || (
  SET str=_other
)
MD "c:\Dirs\!str!\!var!"
...

Please note also the double quotes around the path in MD. That is necessary when the path contains spaces or other special characters. (Thanks @Peter Wright for the note.)

share|improve this answer
2  
Oh, very good! Nevertheless, in the original code, there were two further bugs beyond the /i requirement that Endoro pointed out. The first was that letter was being assigned a value of "1 " not "1" because the space is included in a string set. You could have cured this either by eliminating the space after the 1 or by using a set /a instead. The second was that once letter had been set, it would never be UNset, so any NON-letter intial character that appeared after the first LETTER initial character would have ALSO been classed as a letter... –  Magoo Apr 12 '13 at 19:58
    
Thanks for all the help! I added /i for ignoring the case of the letters, and deleted the space so that letter=1. Last problem is that the lines in the script contain spaces and this causes problems. How to solve this? Do I need to add quotes? –  Mbrouwer88 Apr 12 '13 at 20:23
2  
Quoting the directorynames to be created like this IF !letter!==1 ( md "c:\Dirs\!str!\!var!") ELSE ( md "c:\Dirs\_Other\!var!") should cure your spaces problem, if I've understood it correctly. –  Magoo Apr 12 '13 at 21:11
    
You need to add the /B option, or else start your search string with ^ to make sure that you match only the first character of the line.\ –  dbenham Apr 13 '13 at 1:48
    
@dbenham: The str is assigned a single character (the var's first one), so, this shouldn't be an issue. –  Andriy M Apr 13 '13 at 9:03

This doesn't work for a, only for A:

IF !str!==A ( set letter=1 )

replace it with:

IF /i !str!==A ( set letter=1 )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the help! I added /i for ignoring the case of the letters, and deleted the space so that letter=1. Last problem is that the lines in the script contain spaces and this causes problems. How to solve this? Do I need to add quotes? –  Mbrouwer88 Apr 12 '13 at 20:24
    
best is: IF /i "!str!"=="A" set /a letter=1 –  Endoro Apr 12 '13 at 20:27

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