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I would like to speed up my bootstrap function, which works perfectly fine itself. I read that since R 2.14 there is a package called parallel, but I find it very hard for sb. with low knowledge of computer science to really implement it. Maybe somebody can help.

So here we have a bootstrap:

n<-1000
boot<-1000
x<-rnorm(n,0,1)
y<-rnorm(n,1+2*x,2)
data<-data.frame(x,y)
boot_b<-numeric()
for(i in 1:boot){
  bootstrap_data<-data[sample(nrow(data),nrow(data),replace=T),]
  boot_b[i]<-lm(y~x,bootstrap_data)$coef[2]
  print(paste('Run',i,sep=" "))
}

The goal is to use parallel processing / exploit the multiple cores of my PC. I am running R under Windows. Thanks!

EDIT (after reply by Noah)

The following syntax can be used for testing:

library(foreach)
library(parallel)
library(doParallel)
registerDoParallel(cores=detectCores(all.tests=TRUE))
n<-1000
boot<-1000
x<-rnorm(n,0,1)
y<-rnorm(n,1+2*x,2)
data<-data.frame(x,y)
start1<-Sys.time()
boot_b <- foreach(i=1:boot, .combine=c) %dopar% {
  bootstrap_data<-data[sample(nrow(data),nrow(data),replace=T),]
  unname(lm(y~x,bootstrap_data)$coef[2])
}
end1<-Sys.time()
boot_b<-numeric()
start2<-Sys.time()
for(i in 1:boot){
  bootstrap_data<-data[sample(nrow(data),nrow(data),replace=T),]
  boot_b[i]<-lm(y~x,bootstrap_data)$coef[2]
}
end2<-Sys.time()
start1-end1
start2-end2
as.numeric(start1-end1)/as.numeric(start2-end2)

However, on my machine the simple R code is quicker. Is this one of the known side effects of parallel processing, i.e. it causes overheads to fork the process which add to the time in 'simple tasks' like this one?

Edit: On my machine the parallel code takes about 5 times longer than the 'simple' code. This factor apparently does not change as I increase the complexity of the task (e.g. increase boot or n). So maybe there is an issue with the code or my machine (Windows based processing?).

share|improve this question

I haven't tested foreach with the parallel backend on Windows, but I believe this will work for you:

library(foreach)
library(doSNOW)

cl <- makeCluster(c("localhost","localhost"), type = "SOCK")
registerDoSNOW(cl=cl)

n<-1000
boot<-1000
x<-rnorm(n,0,1)
y<-rnorm(n,1+2*x,2)
data<-data.frame(x,y)
boot_b <- foreach(i=1:boot, .combine=c) %dopar% {
  bootstrap_data<-data[sample(nrow(data),nrow(data),replace=T),]
  unname(lm(y~x,bootstrap_data)$coef[2])
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I sumitted the suggested syntax to testing (edited code above). It now uses 100% of my CPU (i.e. all processors). However, this is slower than doing it without parallel processing, see above. – tomka Apr 16 '13 at 12:57
    
Would be great if you can give any additional suggestions on the time problem, i.e. why is your suggestion not speeding it up? Thanks. – tomka Apr 16 '13 at 13:51
    
Hmm. Interesting. On my machine, (8 HT cores, 8 GB ram, Ubuntu 12.04), I got a speedup of about 3.4X with little RAM usage. I'm not as familiar with multithreading in a windows environment. Here's some things to try: – Noah Apr 16 '13 at 17:53
    
1) Pass a number to the cores argument of registerDoParallel, instead of trying to automatically detect them. 2) Sort the Task Manager decreasing on CPU usage and see when the processes start spinning up. If they're not starting, or if they're hanging, it may indicate that there are problems using the parallel package. You might try snow instead. – Noah Apr 16 '13 at 18:00
    
I will check this. Meanwhile, I read that multicore does not work (well/not at all?) on Windows machines. Maybe this is related? And just to be sure: the factor of 3.4 you are giving, is that computed from my code above? Because as.numeric(start1-end1)/as.numeric(start2-end2) will give you the factor of how much longer the parallel processing takes. Or did you take the inverse? – tomka Apr 17 '13 at 7:34

Try the boot package. It is well-optimized, and contains a parallel argument. The tricky thing with this package is that you have to write new functions to calculate your statistic, which accept the data you are working on and a vector of indices to resample the data. So, starting from where you define data, you could do something like this:

# Define a function to resample the data set from a vector of indices
# and return the slope
slopeFun <- function(df, i) {
  #df must be a data frame.
  #i is the vector of row indices that boot will pass
  xResamp <- df[i, ]
  slope <- lm(y ~ x, data=xResamp)$coef[2] 
} 

# Then carry out the resampling
b <- boot(data, slopeFun, R=1000, parallel="multicore")

b$t is a vector of the resampled statistic, and boot has lots of nice methods to easily do stuff with it - for instance plot(b)

Note that the parallel methods depend on your platform. On your Windows machine, you'll need to use parallel="snow".

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is speeding it up by something like 25% on my machine. That's nice. In the real application I am looking at, the problem is much more complex, because my function returns a list of parameters, which all have to be bootstrapped. Therefore I am looking for a direct implementation of parallel. – tomka Apr 16 '13 at 14:10

I think the main problem is that you have a lot of small tasks. In some cases, you can improve your performance by using task chunking, which results in fewer, but larger data transfers between the master and workers, which is often more efficient:

boot_b <- foreach(b=idiv(boot, chunks=getDoParWorkers()), .combine='c') %dopar% {
  sapply(1:b, function(i) {
    bdata <- data[sample(nrow(data), nrow(data), replace=T),]
    lm(y~x, bdata)$coef[[2]]
  })
}

I like using the idiv function for this, but you could b=rep(boot/detectCores(),detectCores()) if you like.

share|improve this answer

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