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I thougt, printf would take also a va_list
but when i do so, printf doesn't do what I want printf to do:

void Log(int loglevel, char* string, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, string);

    switch (type)
    {
        case LOGLEVEL_FATAL:
            printf("FATAL: ");
            break;

        case LOGLEVEL_ERROR:
            printf("ERROR: ");
            break;

        case LOGLEVEL_WARNING:
            printf("WARNING: ");
            break;

        case LOGLEVEL_INFO:
            printf("INFO: ");
            break;
    }

    printf(string, args);
    va_end(args);
}

When i now call:

Log(LOGLEVEL_INFO, "testvariable = %f", 16.0);

the output is:

INFO: testvariable = 0.000000

But why?
What's my mistake?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The final printf() call should be to vprintf() ("v" for varargs).

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but why dont i get an error if i pass an va_list to printf()? –  Malte Schmitz Apr 12 '13 at 18:46
1  
@Schnizel1337: Because printf() isn't typesafe. In your case it expects a double and gets a va_list. However, this isn't checked. –  NPE Apr 12 '13 at 18:47
    
@Schnizel1337 printf() accepts anything and interprets its arguments only according to the format specifiers. The va_list is a single argument. Have you seen a format specifier for a va_list? –  Angew Apr 12 '13 at 18:47
    
@NPE oh right.. yeah –  Malte Schmitz Apr 12 '13 at 18:50

In C++11 you can do this (in a header file):

template<typename... Args>
void Log(int loglevel, char* string, Args&&... args)
{
    switch (type)
    {
        case LOGLEVEL_FATAL:
            printf("FATAL: ");
            break;

        case LOGLEVEL_ERROR:
            printf("ERROR: ");
            break;

        case LOGLEVEL_WARNING:
            printf("WARNING: ");
            break;

        case LOGLEVEL_INFO:
            printf("INFO: ");
            break;
    }

    printf(string, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

which would also, in theory, let you parse string and determine if the args are in fact the right ones, rather than blindly crashing.

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