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I am coding a hash tree in C++, where I need two different types of nodes i.e. one for non leaf that will simply point to its children and other for leaf node which contains the required information.

The problem I am facing is that how can I declare pointers in non leaf node. Because some non leaf nodes are to point other non leaf nodes and some have to point the leaf nodes. So I cant declare one pointer type to the pointer in non leaf node.

Any help would be appreciated.

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Are you coding it in C or in C++? –  NPE Apr 12 '13 at 18:51
    
@NPE basically in c++, but i am comfortable in both. –  Akashdeep Saluja Apr 12 '13 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would approach this with a union and a flag in the header that told me whether the pointer in question was pointing to a node or a leaf.

struct Header
{
   int isLeaf;
}

struct Leaf
{
    struct Header header;
    struct LeafBody body;
}

struct Node
{
    struct Header header;
    struct NodeBody body;
}

union Entity
{
    struct Header header;
    struct Node   node;
    struct Leaf   leaf;
}
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so what would be the structure of the node, can you explain a bit more. –  Akashdeep Saluja Apr 12 '13 at 18:55
    
Does the above edit help? Or do you need more? The NodeBody could easily just be a pointer to an instance of Entity –  K Scott Piel Apr 12 '13 at 18:57

Rather than having a leaf node and a none leaf node, you could just have one node class with a data pointer. If the node is not a leaf node, then the data pointer will be NULL. If the node is a leaf node then the Node* will be NULL.

struct Node
{
    Node *child; // NULL if leaf node
    Data *data;  // NULL if not leaf node
};
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The only caveat I would mention on this, which could be a non-issue in a general application, but a non-trivial issue in a large tree. This approach requires allocating two pointers for every entry in the table of which 1/2 is not used, in addition to allocating the entry itself. Most likely not a problem... potentially a very large memory sink if the table is huge. –  K Scott Piel Apr 12 '13 at 19:06

There are several solutions to this. You could simply make a nonleaf inherit from the leaf, and let polymorphism handle it. Or use a union and a flag to determine which one to use. Or dirtiest of all, but sometimes valid, is a simple void* which you can always cast back to whatever you need. Depending on your specific needs: the union will perform best, the polymorphism will be most readable, and void* would be same performance as union and depending on taste a tad cleaner code if you dislike unions.

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