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Say I have two dataframes x and y in Pandas, I would like to fill in a column in x with the result of sorting a column in y. I tried this:

x['foo']  = y['bar'].order(ascending=False)

but it didn't work, I suspect because Pandas aligns indices between x and y (which have the same set of indices) during the assignment

How can I have Pandas fill in the x['foo'] with another column from another dataframe ignoring the alignment of indices?

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1 Answer 1

The simplest way I can think of to get pandas to ignore the indices is to give it something without indices to ignore. Starting from

>>> x = pd.DataFrame({"foo": [10,20,30]},index=[1,2,0])
>>> y = pd.DataFrame({"bar": [33,11,22]},index=[0,1,2])
>>> x
   foo
1   10
2   20
0   30
>>> y
   bar
0   33
1   11
2   22

We have the usual aligned approach:

>>> x["foo"] = y["bar"].order(ascending=False)
>>> x
   foo
1   11
2   22
0   33

Or an unaligned one, by setting x["foo"] to a list:

>>> x["foo"] = y["bar"].order(ascending=False).tolist()
>>> x
   foo
1   33
2   22
0   11
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I see, thanks. Would my_series.tolist() be better/worse than np.array(my_series) or my_series.values() ? –  Amelio Vazquez-Reina Apr 12 '13 at 20:17
2  
Except in some boundary cases I don't know if it would make much difference. Come to think of it, my_series.values might be better at that, as it shouldn't have to go via a Python list, and so could be faster. [Checks.. yeah, at least sometimes it's faster.] –  DSM Apr 12 '13 at 20:24

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