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I am trying to remove external links from an HTML document but keep the anchors but I'm not having much luck. The following regex

$html =~ s/<a href=".+?\.htm">(.+?)<\/a>/$1/sig;

will match the beginning of an anchor tag and the end of an external link tag e.g.

<a HREF="#FN1" name="01">1</a>
some other html
<a href="155.htm">No. 155
</a> <!-- end tag not necessarily on the same line -->

so I end up with nothing instead of

<a HREF="#FN1" name="01">1</a>
some other html

It just so happens that all anchors have their href attribute in uppercase, so I know I can do a case sensitive match, but I don't want to rely on it always being the case in the future.

Is the something I can change so it only matches the one a tag?

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13  
Oh, how it hurts my brain whenever I see another "How do I uses regexes to parse HTML?" question. Look at stackoverflow.com/questions/701166/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/773340/… (and stackoverflow.com/questions/487213/… in your case) before continuing with this. –  Chris Lutz Oct 21 '09 at 0:29
4  
In a general case, yes, regex isn't really designed for parsing XML/HTML. That said, if the problem space is limited it can be a viable option. –  Amber Oct 21 '09 at 0:32
2  
There is a great article by Mark Jason Dominus here: perl.plover.com/yak/12views/samples/notes.html "Let's not forget the things that are good about Perl. It's good at interacting with other programs, and it's good for rapid prototyping. Let's not hassle people when they use Perl the way it was designed to be used." –  user181548 Oct 21 '09 at 3:01
2  
@Kinopiko You cannot ignore what MJD's discussing. Plus, MJD is not defending a method that will give wrong results. Plus, I am in complete agreement with MJD on invoking external commands. Now, the people on this page who are objecting to parsing HTML with regexes, have made reasonable, thoughtful arguments showing you how easily that method fails. You happen to ignore all those arguments, claim this is dogma. Oh well. books.google.com/… –  Sinan Ünür Oct 21 '09 at 3:44
4  
@Kinopiko, Cigarettes cause cancer. Human activity has a major role in climate change. Humans and apes share a common ancestor. Many people claim that these facts are mere dogma. But it doesn't change the fact that they are true. Parsing HTML with regexes is a bad idea. Sometimes worse is better, but in this case relying on a regex is asking for trouble--oops, we had a link to a .php file, oops, here's a link to a .cgi, ad naseum--so the regex grows, ever more ungainly, and always broken. A real parser approach is easier to write (correct code), easier to maintain and easier to understand. –  daotoad Oct 21 '09 at 6:43

4 Answers 4

Echoing Chris Lutz' comment, I hope the following shows that it is really straightforward to use a parser (especially if you want to be able to deal with input you have not yet seen such as <a class="external" href="...">) rather than putting together fragile solutions using s///.

If you are going to take the s/// route, at least be honest, do depend on href attributes being all upper case instead of putting up an illusion of flexibility.

Edit: By popular demand ;-), here is the version using HTML::TokeParser::Simple. See the edit history for the version using just HTML::TokeParser.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;
use HTML::TokeParser::Simple;

my $parser = HTML::TokeParser::Simple->new(\*DATA);

while ( my $token = $parser->get_token ) {
    if ($token->is_start_tag('a')) {
        my $href = $token->get_attr('href');
        if (defined $href and $href !~ /^#/) {
            print $parser->get_trimmed_text('/a');
            $parser->get_token; # discard </a>
            next;
        }
    }
    print $token->as_is;
}

__DATA__
<a HREF="#FN1" name="01">1</a>
some other html
<a href="155.htm">No. 155
</a> <!-- end tag not necessarily on the same line -->
<a class="external" href="http://example.com">An example you
might not have considered</a>

<p>Maybe you did not consider <a
href="test.html">click here >>></a>
either</p>

Output:

C:\Temp> hjk
<a HREF="#FN1" name="01">1</a>
some other html
No. 155 <!-- end tag not necessarily on the same line -->
An example you might not have considered

<p>Maybe you did not consider click here >>>
either</p>

NB: The regex based solution you checked as ''correct'' breaks if the files that are linked to have the .html extension rather than .htm. Given that, I find your concern with not relying on the upper case HREF attributes unwarranted. If you really want quick and dirty, you should not bother with anything else and you should rely on the all caps HREF and be done with it. If, however, you want to ensure that your code works with a much larger variety of documents and for much longer, you should use a proper parser.

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2  
+1 for the example he might not have considered. That's what should have been my argument against regexes in this case. –  Chris Lutz Oct 21 '09 at 2:18
4  
@Kinopiko: 1. It's correct, unlike your solution, which breaks in any number of situations. 2. Code should be readable by someone who is competent. References are not a steep barrier to entry. A complete understanding of references is much easier for a beginner to come by than a complete understanding of regexes. 3. I would prefer HTML::TokeParser::Simple for its more readable interface, but if you can't spend a moment looking at the docs, once again, you fail it. –  hobbs Oct 21 '09 at 3:12
4  
And 4. A module is used because once again this is not a trivial problem. If you treat it as a trivial problem you get a solution that is wrong, like the original poster's and like yours. A module suited to the task is almost guaranteed to be less buggy. –  hobbs Oct 21 '09 at 3:13
3  
I agree that the magic numbers are confusing. This is a property of HTML::TokeParser rather than the general "don't parse with regexes". Using XML::LibXML's implementation of the W3C DOM would have been clearer, but more verbose. –  jrockway Oct 21 '09 at 3:20
2  
Who care is CPAN modules often do anything? It only matters what the CPAN module you need does. –  brian d foy Oct 21 '09 at 11:10

A bit more like a SAX type parser is HTML::Parser:

use strict;
use warnings;

use English qw<$OS_ERROR>;
use HTML::Parser;
use List::Util qw<first>;

my $omitted;

sub tag_handler { 
    my ( $self, $tag_name, $text, $attr_hashref ) = @_;
    if ( $tag_name eq 'a' ) { 
        my $href = first {; defined } @$attr_hashref{ qw<href HREF> };
        $omitted = substr( $href, 0, 7 ) eq 'http://';
        return if $omitted;
    }
    print $text;
}

sub end_handler { 
    my $tag_name = shift;
    if ( $tag_name eq 'a' && $omitted ) { 
        $omitted = false;
        return;
    }
    print shift;
}

my $parser
    = HTML::Parser->new( api_version => 3
                       , default_h   => [ sub { print shift; }, 'text' ]
                       , start_h     => [ \&tag_handler, 'self,tagname,text,attr' ]
                       , end_h       => [ \&end_handler, 'tagname,text' ]
                       );
$parser->parse_file( $path_to_file ) or die $OS_ERROR;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 BTW, see perlfoundation.org/perl5/… on Smart::Comments. I am not sure if I feel that strongly, but I am in general not a fan of source filters. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 21 '09 at 3:33
1  
@Sinan Ünür: normally I remove debugging code from my finished answers. That's where Smart::Comments shines though, is debugging code. –  Axeman Oct 21 '09 at 4:36
    
That's not bad, but eventually does rely on another regular expression. However, HTML::Parser will give you attributes and their values if you ask nicely. –  innaM Oct 21 '09 at 8:21
    
@Manni: Agree--and I knew that it did that, but I didn't want to write a complicated pipe when I was altering the tag--but it makes a better solution, if I'm not writing out anything. I'm going to change it. –  Axeman Oct 21 '09 at 18:09

Why not just only remove links for which the href attribute doesn't begin with a pound sign? Something like this:

html =~ s/<a href="[^#][^"]*?">(.+?)<\/a>/$1/sig;
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't handle bare links--I know, bare links are gross, and you'll never find them in HTML I write or write a generator for, but they and single-quoted attributes fit the spec. –  Axeman Oct 21 '09 at 20:01

Yet another solution. I love HTML::TreeBuilder and family.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use HTML::TreeBuilder;

my $root = HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_file(\*DATA);
foreach my $a ($root->find_by_tag_name('a')) {
    if ($a->attr('href') !~ /^#/) {
        $a->replace_with_content($a->as_text);
    }
}
print $root->as_HTML(undef, "\t");

__DATA__
<a HREF="#FN1" name="01">1</a>
some other html
<a href="155.htm">No. 155
</a> <!-- end tag not necessarily on the same line -->
<a class="external" href="http://example.com">An example you
might not have considered</a>

<p>Maybe you did not consider <a
href="test.html">click here >>></a>
either</p>
share|improve this answer

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