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I am re-creating the unix shell commands and am currently doing ls. I have to mimic ls -l which shows permissions, file size, ect. The native ls -l if formatted well so every column stays aligned like this:

-rw-r--r-- 1 matt matt 1474560 Apr 11 14:54 diskimage
drwxr-xr-x 2 matt matt    4096 Mar 25 15:31 Example
-rwxr-xr-x 1 matt matt   26375 Apr 12 14:24 final
-rwxr-xr-x 1 matt matt      75 Apr 11 14:39 log.sh

Right now, my version of ls does almost the same thing, except my columns do not line up when different values are used in the printf() function like this:

drwxr-xr-x     0   1024    Dec 03 14:11      .
drwxr-xr-x     0   1024    Dec 03 14:11      ..
drwxr-xr-x     0   1024    Dec 03 13:57      Z
drwxr-xr-x     0   1024    Dec 03 14:11      X
drwxr-xr-x     0   1024    Dec 03 13:56      Y
-rw-r--r--     0   334632    Dec 10 08:39      big

As you can see, the last entry is not aligned because the size column is bigger than the rest. How can I tell the printf function to print in a formatted way with automatically aligned columns?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's how:

printf("%8d", 334632);

The number before the d conversion specifier tells printf() to pad the printed number with whitespace so that it occupies (at least) for example, 8 characters on screen. You can write any integer number there. A complete format string for your case might be something like:

"%9s\t%4d\t%8d\t%16s\n"

If you want a variable amount of padding:

printf("%*d\n", max_field_width, 42);
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1  
Ive seen this before, but what if I want the 8 to be a number that changes based on the longest value that is given –  Matt Hintzke Apr 12 '13 at 21:34
1  
@MattHintzke Then you use * and an additional argument. Please man printf(). –  user529758 Apr 12 '13 at 21:34

For each column you should find the max length and apply a padding of that length of each of the entries of that column.

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This is the basic idea:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a[] = {1, 1213, 3133123, 312, 0, 2}; 
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 6; i++) 
        printf("str %9d\n", a[i]);
    return 0;
}

Output

str         1
str      1213
str   3133123
str       312
str         0
str         2

You can also get the required number of spaces using some math:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main()
{
    int a[] = {1, 1213, 3133123, 312, 0, 2}; 
    int i, max_digits=0;
    for (i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
        int d;
        d = a[i] == 0 ? 1 : ceil(log(abs(a[i]))/log(10));
        if (d > max_digits)
            max_digits = d;
    }   
    for (i = 0; i < 6; i++) 
        printf("str %*d\n", max_digits + 1, a[i]);
    return 0;
}
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No, this outputs "str % 9d" 6 times. –  user529758 Apr 12 '13 at 21:36
    
@H2CO3, it does not: ideone.com/x7tsEz –  perreal Apr 12 '13 at 21:44

Take a look at my small library libTPrint: https://github.com/wizzard/libtprint

It prints data in columns (you can show / hide borders).

The code is very simple, I'm sure you will find there several useful tips.

Hope it helps !

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