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I can't for the life of me figure out when OnItemUpdated gets fired. I've been messing around in ASP.NET trying to learn it, so some of the things you see in this code might be purposely done the hard way (so I can better understand whats going on behind the scenes)

Basically, I have a GridView that is the master control that uses a formview as a detail.

Here is the SelectedIndexChanged method for GridView

protected void GridView1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var context = new DataAccessLayer.SafetyEntities();
    var se = (from c in context.Employees
                  where c.EID == (long)GridView1.SelectedDataKey.Value
                  select c).ToList();
    FormView1.DataSource = se;
    FormView1.DataKeyNames = new string[] { "EID" };
    FormView1.DataBind();
}

That's working fine, it displays the selected details in the form for editing. This is what the formview looks like:

<asp:FormView ID="FormView1" runat="server" DefaultMode="Edit" OnItemUpdating = "FormView1_ItemUpdating" OnItemUpdated="BLAH">
    <ItemTemplate>
        Select an employee!
     </ItemTemplate>
     <EditItemTemplate>
         <table>
             <tr>
                 <th>Name: 
                 </th>
                    <td>
                        <asp:TextBox runat="server" ID ="NameEdit" Text='<%#Bind("Name") %>' /> 
                    </td>
                    <br />
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <th>Manager: 
                </th>
                <td>
                    <asp:DropDownList ID = "DDLEdit1" DataSourceID = "ManagerEntitySource" runat="server"
                           DataTextField = "Option_Value" DataValueField = "Option_Value"
                           SelectedValue = '<%#Bind("Manager") %>'  
                           AppendDataBoundItems="true">
                    </asp:DropDownList> 
                </td>
                <br />
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <th>Location: 
                </th>
                <td>
                    <asp:DropDownList ID="DDLEdit2" DataSourceID = "LocationEntitySource" runat="server"
                           DataTextField = "Option_Value" DataValueField = "Option_Value"
                           SelectedValue='<%#Bind("Building") %>' 
                           AppendDataBoundItems="true">
                    </asp:DropDownList>
                </td>
                <br />
        </table>
        <asp:Button ID="Button2" Text="Submit Changes" runat="server" CommandName="Update" />
            <!--<asp:LinkButton ID = "LB1" Text="Update" CommandName="Update" runat="server" /> -->
    </EditItemTemplate>       
</asp:FormView>

This works as well. You can see from the attributes of the FormView that I specify OnItemUpdating and OnItemUpdated.

Here is OnItemUpdating:

protected void FormView1_ItemUpdating(object source, FormViewUpdateEventArgs e)
{
   DebugBox.Text = FormView1.DataKey.Value.ToString();
   DataAccessLayer.SafetyEntities se = new DataAccessLayer.SafetyEntities();
   var key = Convert.ToInt32(FormView1.DataKey.Value.ToString());
   DataAccessLayer.Employee employeeToUpdate = se.Employees.Where(emp => emp.EID == key).First();
   employeeToUpdate.Name = e.NewValues["Name"].ToString();
   employeeToUpdate.Manager = e.NewValues["Manager"].ToString();
   employeeToUpdate.Building = e.NewValues["Building"].ToString();
   se.SaveChanges();
   GridView1.DataBind();

}

This works fine as well. The items are being updated appropriately and the GridView is refreshing.

Here is OnItemUpdated:

protected void BLAH(object source, FormViewUpdatedEventArgs e)
{
    DebugBox2.Text = "BLAH!!!!";
}

And here is the problem. This never gets called! Am I missing a step somewhere to get this event to fire? I thought I understood that the button would call Command="Update" which would fire ItemUpdating and then ItemUpdated. Its definitely calling ItemUpdating, but thats it. Do I need something additional to fire ItemUpdated?

share|improve this question
    
Take a look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… it talks a bit about using the FormView and may have the details you need. – Timothy Randall Apr 13 '13 at 1:15
    
@TimothyRandall nope... – SmashCode Apr 13 '13 at 7:26
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Conclusion:

Looking at the source code of the FormView class it seems that the ItemUpdated event is not fired when using DataBinding.

The ItemUpdated event only gets fired when you set the SelectMethod, UpdateMethod, DeleteMethod or InsertMethod properties of the FormView.

The proof

When you're updating an item in your FormView its 'UpdateItem' method is called which internally calls HandleUpdate.

public virtual void UpdateItem(bool causesValidation)
    {
      this.ResetModelValidationGroup(causesValidation, string.Empty);
      this.HandleUpdate(string.Empty, causesValidation);
    }

private void HandleUpdate(string commandArg, bool causesValidation)
    {
       // Lots of work is done here
    }

At the bottom of the HandleUpdate method, the OnItemUpdating event is triggered:

this.OnItemUpdating(e);

which is then followed by a rather curious line of code:

if (e.Cancel || !bindingAutomatic)
          return;

This in turn is followd by a call to Update on the dataSourceView.

dataSourceView.Update((IDictionary) e.Keys, (IDictionary) e.NewValues, 
(IDictionary) e.OldValues, 
new DataSourceViewOperationCallback(this.HandleUpdateCallback));

We can see that the last parameter of the Update method takes a callback which in this case is HandleUpdateCallback. HandleUpdateCallback is the place where our OnItemUpdated event is finally triggered.

private bool HandleUpdateCallback(int affectedRows, Exception ex)
    {
      FormViewUpdatedEventArgs e1 = new FormViewUpdatedEventArgs(
                                                       affectedRows, ex);
      e1.SetOldValues(this._updateOldValues);
      e1.SetNewValues(this._updateNewValues);
      e1.SetKeys(this._updateKeys);
      this.OnItemUpdated(e1);
      // A lot of other stuff goes on here
     }

So, that's the map of how we eventually get to the OnItemUpdated method being executed but why isn't it being executed in our case?

Let's skip back a little but to the "curious" part of the HandleUpdate method I mentioned earlier:

if (e.Cancel || !bindingAutomatic)
          return;

What's going on here? We're not cancelling our event but what about !bindingAutomatic, what's happening there?

The value is set further up in the HandleUpdate method:

bool bindingAutomatic = this.IsDataBindingAutomatic;

This property, IsDataBindingAutomatic, is an internal property on the BaseDataBound class (a base class bit further up the chain from our FormView class):

  protected internal bool IsDataBindingAutomatic
    {
      get
      {
        if (!this.IsBoundUsingDataSourceID)
          return this.IsUsingModelBinders;
        else
          return true;
      }
    }

Since we're not using a DataSourceID we end up returning the value of IsUsingModelBinders. This is a virtual property on the BaseDataBoundControl that is overriden in the CompositeDataBoundControl class, the base class that our FormView directly inherits from.

Now we get to the bit of code that directly determines whether our OnItemUpdating method will be fired:

protected override bool IsUsingModelBinders
    {
      get
      {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.SelectMethod) 
            && string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.UpdateMethod) 
            && string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.DeleteMethod))
          return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.InsertMethod);
        else
          return true;
      }
    }

This is basically saying that if we've set a SelectMethod, an UpdateMethod, or a DeleteMethod (these are string properties on the FormView) then return true, otherwise tell us if we've set an InsertMethod. In our case we haven't set any of these properties up and so we get a return value of false.

Because this is false, our curious piece of code from twice earlier simply returns and never reaches the part of the code that triggers the ItemUpdated event.

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