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This is part of my code which I need help with:

// simple service locator
public class ServiceManager<TSvc> : IServiceManager<TSvc> where TSvc: class, IService
{
   private Dictionary<object, TSvc> services;

   public void RegisterService(TSvc service)
    {
        // omitted code here
        this.services.Add(service.GetType(), service); // dictionary
    }
    public T GetService<T>() where T : TSvc
    {
        T result = default(T);

        TSvc bufResult = null;
        if (this.services.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out bufResult))
            result = (T)bufResult;

        return result;
    }
    public TSvc GetService(Type serviceType)
    {
        TSvc result = null;

        this.services.TryGetValue(serviceType, out result);

        return result;
    }
}

Then my domain interfaces:

public interface IItem
{
   string Name { get; set; }
}
public interface IRepository<TModel> where TModel : IItem
{
    new IEnumerable<TModel> GetItems();
    void InsertItem(TModel item);
    void UpdateItem(TModel item);
    void DeleteItem(TModel item);
}
public interface IService<TModel> where TModel : IItem
{
    IRepository<TModel> Repository { get; }
}

Then some of my domain classes:

public class Book: IItem
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
public class BookRepo: IRepository<Book>
{
    new IEnumerable<Book> GetItems();
    void InsertItem(Book item);
    void UpdateItem(Book item);
    void DeleteItem(Book item);
}
public class BookService: IService<Book>
{
    IRepository<Book> IService<Book>.Repository { get { return this.Repository; } }
    BookRepo Repository { get; set;} 
}

Now, if I am interested to use 'BookService' and do something with it, I could get it from service locator like this:

public void DoSomething()
{
    var bookService = serviceManager.GetService<BookService>();
    bookService.Repository.Insert(new Book()); 
}

But the problem is that the type of the service is known only at runtime (eg. selection from combobox). So, how would DoSomething method look like?

public void DoSomething()
{
    var typeOfService = combobox.SelectedValue.GetType(); // cbx of services
    // ??? make use of serviceManager and typeOfService to get appropriate 'service'
    service.Repository.Insert(/*new IITem here*/);
}

Also, I would like to know how would you connect IService to IService<TModel>... it could even get to the solution, but I have no idea how. My IService interface is blank for the moment...

I would really appreciate your time. Please let me know if there is something unclear! Thank you!

Update: Based on your answers, I guess the reflection part could be involved (something like NSGaga pointed out), but still, without connecting IService and IService<TModel> I cannot achieve what I want. Who has any idea how to redesign this?

share|improve this question
    
Is there any reason you're not using an existing Dependency Container such as Ninject or Unity as opposed to building your own? –  Kenneth Apr 12 '13 at 22:32
    
@Kenneth: The reason of learning would suffice? :) Is a good opportunity to learn manipulating interfaces and use generics –  Learner Apr 12 '13 at 22:33
    
OK, understandable! I just thought that if you were after just a working solution as fast as possible I'd point you to one of the frameworks. –  Kenneth Apr 12 '13 at 22:41
    
Thank you Kenneth –  Learner Apr 12 '13 at 22:43

2 Answers 2

Something like this should work (typing from my head, so you'd need to check the syntax details - but should give you the direction - or I'll add on later)

MethodInfo methodInfo = typeof(ServiceManager).GetMethod("GetService");
MethodInfo methodInfoGeneric = methodInfo.MakeGenericMethod(new[] { typeOfService });
methodInfoGeneric.Invoke(serviceManager, new object[] { });
share|improve this answer
    
So, reflection way... is really good to know such details... Thank you! –  Learner Apr 12 '13 at 22:46
    
you're welcome Cristi - there is no other way to 'move' from Type into a 'strong typed` world. –  NSGaga Apr 12 '13 at 22:46
    
btw, I still need somehow a connection between IService and IService<TModel>, otherwise it cannot work. How would my IService look like? –  Learner Apr 12 '13 at 22:54
    
could you just add some details (what you want exactly, small example) - if you want to get a generic type IService<some type> - then it's similar you just use typeof(IService<>).MakeGenericType(new[] { type }); but I don't see that you need that. Do you have some inheritance issues there? Post some more and I'll look into it –  NSGaga Apr 12 '13 at 23:14
1  
np - I like when you said 'the reason of learning' :). Anyway this is too much work :) - your service manager and overall is all messed up. I'd have to rewrite it :). Anyway you could take a look at this post of mine - which is a bit similar (yet different - stackoverflow.com/questions/15687981/…. Maybe if you'd like to open a new question - with the emphasis on the design, as it's entirely different (and a bigger issue), and close this one - just @ me here and I'll try to write something. –  NSGaga Apr 13 '13 at 0:24

To call a generic method where the type is only known at runtime requires using reflection.

For example, in your last code sample, you rightly imply that you can't call GetService<BookService>, but you are still adding new Book() to the service. You would also have to use reflection to instantiate the new object, because, again, you don't know the type at compile time. So you would need to use reflection at least three times: Once to call the method that returns the service, once to create the new object, and once to call the insert method on the service.

You can isolate some of this complexity with dependency injection and inversion of control. For example, create a generic method like this:

void CreateNewObject<T>() where T : new()
{
    var service = GetServiceFor<T>();
    service.Repository.Insert(new T());
}

Now, you only need to use reflection once, to call that method, instead of three times.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good and interesting points! Yes, sorry about that "new Book()" (copy-paste)... and I guess the reflection part I could get it from 'NSGaga' –  Learner Apr 12 '13 at 22:47

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