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I want to send a "pause" signal to a long running task in Celery and I'm trying to figure out the best way to do it. In the view I can pull an instance of the object from the database and tell that to save, but it's not the same as the instance of the object in Celery. The object doesn't check back to see if it's paused.

Polling the database from within the long-running class and task feels weird and impractical so I'm looking at sending my instance a message. I looked at using pubsub but I would prefer to use Django signals as it's already a Django project. I might be approaching this the wrong way.

Here's an example that does not work:

Models.py

class LongRunningClass(models.Model):
    is_paused = models.BooleanField(default=False)
    processed_files = models.IntegerField(default=0)
    total_files = models.IntegerField(default=100)

    def long_task(self):
        remaining_files = self.total_files - self.processed_files
        for i in xrange(remaining_files):
            if not self.is_paused:
                self.processed_files += 1
                time.sleep(1)

        # Task complete, let's save.
        self.save()

Views.py

def pause_task(self, pk):
     lrc = LongRunningClass.objects.get(pk=pk)
     lrc.is_paused = True
     lrc.save()
     return HttpResponse(json.dumps({'is_paused': lrc.is_paused}))


def resume_task(self, pk):
    lrc = LongRunningClass.objects.get(pk=pk)
    lrc.is_paused = False
    lrc.save()

    # Pretend this is a Celery task
    lrc.long_task()

So if I modify models.py to use signals, I can add these lines but it still does not quite work:

pause_signal = django.dispatch.Signal(providing_args=['is_paused'])

@django.dispatch.receiver(pause_signal)
def pause_callback(sender, **kwargs):
    if 'is_paused' in kwargs:
        sender.is_paused = kwargs['is_paused']
        sender.save()

That doesn't affect the instantiated class that's already running either. How can I tell the instance of my model running within the task to pause?

share|improve this question
    
I've never used celery, but I noticed that in your example setting is_paused only causes the task to finish erarly (it loops through without doing any work). To pause the execution, it would have to be a blocking call... –  mata Apr 12 '13 at 23:29
    
I've updated my example to better illustrate how "pause" works. –  Kevin London Apr 12 '13 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Celery task is a separate process. Django signals is standard "observer" pattern, which works within one thread, so there is no way to orginize communication betwean threads using signals. You need to load object from database to know if its properties has changed.

class LongRunningClass(models.Model):
    is_paused = models.BooleanField(default=False)
    processed_files = models.IntegerField(default=0)
    total_files = models.IntegerField(default=100)

    def get_is_paused(self):
        db_obj = LongRunningClass.objects.get(pk=self.pk)
        return db_obj.is_paused

    def long_task(self):
        remaining_files = self.total_files - self.processed_files
        for i in xrange(remaining_files):
            if not self.get_is_paused:
                self.processed_files += 1
                time.sleep(1)

    # Task complete, let's save.
    self.save() 

Not very good by design - you better to move long_task to other place, and operate with newly loaded LongRunningClass instance, but it will do the job. You could add some memcache here - if you don't want to disturb your database so often.

BTW: I'm not 100% sure but you may have another design issue here. This is rather rare case when you have really long running tasks with this kind of cycle. Think about removing cycle from your program (you have queues!). Take a look:

@celery.task(run_every=2minutes)  # adding XX files for processing every XX minutes
def scheduled_task(lr_pk):
    lr = LongRunningClass.objects.get(pk=lr_pk)
    if not lr.is paused:
        remaining_files = self.total_files - self.processed_files
        for i in xrange(lr.files_per_iteration):
            process_file.delay(lr.pk,i)

@celery.task(rate=1/m,queue='process_file')  # processing each file
def process_file(lr_pk,i):
    #  do somthing with i
    lr = LongRunningClass.objects.get(pk=lr_pk)
    lr.processed_files += 1
    lr.save() 

You have to set up celerybeat, and create separate queue for this types of tasks, to implement this solution. But as a result you will have a lot of control over your program - speed rates, parallel execution and your code would not hang for sleep(1). If you create another model for each file you could control what files are processed and what are not, handle errors etc,etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestions, I think I will probably go memcached in this instance and will consider your other notes as well. –  Kevin London Apr 13 '13 at 1:06

Take a look at celery.contrib.abortable -- this is an alternate base class for Celery tasks that implements a signal between caller and task to handle terminations, that could also be used to implement a "pause".

When caller calls abort(), a status is marked in the backend. Task calls self.is_aborted() to see if that special status has been set; and then implements whatever action is appropriate (terminate, pause, ignore etc.). The action is under the task's control; this is not automated task termination.

This could be used as-is if it is sensible for the specific task to interpret the ABORT signal as a request for a pause. Or you could extend the class to provide more signals, not just the existing ABORT.

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