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This is a piece of code:

def add(a, b) 
  a + b;
end

print "Tell number 1 : "
number1 = gets.to_f

print "and number 2 : "
number2 = gets.to_f

puts "#{number1}+#{number2} = " , add(number1, number2) , "\n"`

When I run it, my results are spread over several lines:

C:\Users\Filip>ruby ext1.rb
Tell number 1 : 2
and number 2 : 3
3.0+3.0 =
5.0


C:\Users\Filip>

Why doesn't puts() print in a single line, and how can keep the output on one line?

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I see no reason to close this unless there's an exact duplicate I couldn't find. It's a real question with a straightforward answer that others are likely to find helpful. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 13 '13 at 2:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

gets() includes the newline. Replace it with gets.strip. (Update: You updated your code, so if you're happy working with floats, this is no longer relevant.)

puts() adds a newline for each argument that doesn't already end in a newline. Your code is equivalent to:

print "#{number1}+#{number2} = ", "\n",
      add(number1, number2) , "\n",
      "\n"

You can replace puts with print:

print "#{number1}+#{number2} = " , add(number1, number2) , "\n"`

or better:

puts "#{number1}+#{number2} = #{add(number1, number2)}"
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Puts adds a newline to the end of the output. Print does not. Try print.

http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/IO.html#method-i-puts

You might also want to replace gets with gets.chomp.

puts "After entering something, you can see the the 'New Line': "
a = gets
print a

puts "After entering something, you can't see the the 'New Line': "
a = gets.chomp
print a
share|improve this answer

Because puts prints a string followed by a newline. If you do not want newlines, use print instead.

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