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Also: Does this code make sense? (I'm new to C, so not sure)

char*s1 = derp[0]; 
char*s2 = derp[1]; 

I feel that derp is an array of pointers to chars (i.e. an array of strings), and I'm trying to get out two strings out of the array. However, when I try to pass these two char*'s into a function (whose prototype is FindMaxOverlap(char*long, char*short), the compiler throws me an error saying that there is an implicit definition of the FindMaxOverlap function).

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Yes, this is an array of char *, but the compiler error is unrelated (that's probably related to a missing header file). –  user529758 Apr 12 '13 at 23:42
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Note that long and short are reserved keywords. –  luser droog Apr 12 '13 at 23:43
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"Implicit definition..." means that the compiler hasn't seen a prototype for the function you're calling, so is guessing at what it takes and returns. It's almost always wrong, though. :P Check whether you're including the header that declares that function. –  cHao Apr 12 '13 at 23:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 char *derp[20]:

declares derp as an array 20 of pointer to char.

char*s1 = derp[0];

declares s1 a pointer to char initialized with the first pointer to char element of derp. It makes sense as long as the first element of derp has been correctly allocated, for example using malloc.

You can pass s1 and s2 to your FindMaxOverlap function, but derp[0] and derp[1] have to point to valid objects.

When you call FindMaxOverlap function, the FindMaxOverlap has to be declared in your source file, for example using an include file or by declaring a prototype at file scope.

Also note that long and short are keywords in C and you cannot use them as identifiers for function parameters.

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See cHao's comment, the issue here has nothing to do with char or allocation, it's just about library includes. –  Matt Phillips Apr 12 '13 at 23:45
    
Thanks! It was being caused by me using the short and long keywords which were reserved :P –  girlrockingguna Apr 12 '13 at 23:57

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