Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing myself a math library making heavy use of templates, especially variadic templates, and would like to implement a Sum functor that can take any number of functors of different types and store them. I would also like to avoid any dynamic memory allocation (as an exercise to myself mostly, I have nothing against dynamic memory allocation in general).

The problem I couldn't find any help on is how to store in a class instances to different types. Something like:

    any_array<Types...> a = {Type1(), Type2(), Type3(), ...};

with some way of iterating through a getting the proper type for each value. Using boost would not be an issue as I'm already using it elsewhere.

I have come up with a solution that seems to work well, but I'd like to see what other ways there might be to approach this problem.

My solution to this is a class that essentially looks like (a fully compiling implementation and example can be found below):

    template <class ... Functions>
    class Sum
    {
        char functions[num_bytes<Functions...>::value];

        template <class Next, class ... Others>
        void SetFunctions(int offset, Next f, Others ... others)
        {
            Next * p = (Next*)(functions + offset);
            *p = f;
            SetFunctions(offset + sizeof(Next), others...);
        }

        template <class Last>
        void SetFunctions(int offset, Last f)
        {
            Last * p = (Last*)(functions + offset);
            *p = f;
        }
    public:
        Sum(Functions ... funcs)
        {
             SetFunctions(0, funcs...);
        }
    };

I like this solution in that it should be easily generalizable to any sort of accumulation functor I could want and the implementation underneath is kept hidden from the user. I'm not sure about storing the raw bytes to these objects but can't think of anything wrong with that per se. The possibility of this being generalized leads me to suspect that it has already been implemented somewhere but I couldn't find anything in my own search.

FWIW here's a full example of my implementation:

    #include <functional>
    #include <boost/mpl/vector.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/sizeof.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/accumulate.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/plus.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/placeholders.hpp>
    #include <boost/mpl/int.hpp>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

    using namespace boost::mpl::placeholders;
    using namespace boost::mpl;

    //Returns the sum of the number of bytes each class takes up.
    //This is used as the size of the array we need to create.
    template <class ... Args>
    struct num_bytes : 
        boost::mpl::accumulate<vector<Args...>,
                               int_<0>,
                               plus<_1, sizeof_<_2> > >::type
    {
    };

    template <class ... Args>
    struct empty_list
    {
        typedef empty_list type;
        static const bool value = sizeof...(Args) == 0;
    };

    template <class ... Functions>
    class Sum
    {
    public:
        Sum(Functions ... functions)
        {
            SetFunctions(0, functions...);
        }

        inline double operator()(double x)
        {
            return evaluate<Functions...>(0, x);
        }
    private:

        template <class Next, class ... Others>
        inline void SetFunctions(int offset, Next f, Others ... funcs)
        {
            Next * p = (Next*)(functions + offset);
            *p = f;
            SetFunctions(offset + sizeof(Next), funcs...);
        }

        template <class Last>
        inline void SetFunctions(int offset, Last f)
        {
            Last * p = (Last*)(functions + offset);
            *p = f;
        }

        //Because we are not passing our function objects down, we
        //have to manually disable this function overload to end the recursive
        //instantiations of this function.
        template <class Next, class ... Others>
        inline double evaluate(int offset, double x, 
                               typename boost::enable_if_c<!empty_list<Others...>::value>::type * dummy = NULL)
        {
            Next * p = (Next*)(functions + offset);
            return evaluate<Others...>(offset + sizeof(Next), x) + (*p)(x);
        }

        template <class Last>
        inline double evaluate(int offset, double x)
        {
            Last * p = (Last*)(functions+offset);
            return (*p)(x);
        }

        char functions[num_bytes<Functions...>::value];
    };

    //Function to help initialize a Sum object
    template <class ... Functions>
    Sum<Functions...> GetSum(Functions ... functions)
    {
        return Sum<Functions...>(functions...);
    }

    //return function object of the form f(x) = x + n.
    std::binder2nd<std::plus<int> > GetTestFunction(int n)
    {
        return std::bind2nd(std::plus<int>(), n);
    }

    int main()
    {
        auto sum = GetSum(GetTestFunction(0),
                          GetTestFunction(1),
                          GetTestFunction(2));
        std::cout << sum(0) << ' ' << sum(1) << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }

Which outputs: 3 6 when run.

NOTE: I could not get this compile with a gcc-4.6, only gcc-4.7 and I used the command line: g++-4.7 -std=c++0x test_sum.cpp -Wall

share|improve this question
    
Take a gander at Boost.Variant. –  Luc Danton Apr 13 '13 at 5:46
    
@LucDanton Taking a gander at Boost.Variant it seems to implement a safe union construct, whereas I need the instances to occupy different places in memory. –  GuyGreer Apr 13 '13 at 6:42
1  
Then why not have more than just one variant object? Perhaps several laid one after the other, one would say as if they were... a row? No, that's not it. It's on the tip of my tongue though. –  Luc Danton Apr 13 '13 at 6:47
    
Also consider boost::any –  mark Apr 13 '13 at 12:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know if it's a good way, but it's a way:

#define BOOST_RESULT_OF_USE_DECLTYPE
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/fusion/include/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/include/fold.hpp>
#include <boost/phoenix.hpp>

namespace fusion=boost::fusion;
namespace phx=boost::phoenix;


template <class ... Functions>
class Sum
{
public:
    Sum(Functions ... functions):functions_(functions...)
    {

    }

    inline double operator()(double x)
    {
        return fusion::fold(functions_,0,eval(x));
    }
private:

    template <typename Arg>
    struct evaluate
    {
        evaluate(const Arg& arg):arg_(arg){}
        template <typename State, typename Func>
        State operator()(State const& current_state, const Func& f)
        {
           return current_state + f(arg_);
        }
        Arg arg_;
    };

    template <typename Arg>
    evaluate<Arg> eval(const Arg& arg)
    {
       return evaluate<Arg>(arg);
    }


    fusion::vector<Functions...> functions_;
};

//Function to help initialize a Sum object
template <class ... Functions>
Sum<Functions...> GetSum(Functions ... functions)
{
    return Sum<Functions...>(functions...);
}

//return function object of the form f(x) = x + n.
std::binder2nd<std::plus<int> > GetTestFunction(int n)
{
    return std::bind2nd(std::plus<int>(), n);
}

struct plus_two
{
   double operator()(double arg) const
   {
      return arg+2;
   }
};

int main()
{
    auto sum = GetSum(GetTestFunction(0),
                      phx::arg_names::_1+1,
                      plus_two());
    std::cout << sum(0) << ' ' << sum(1) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked like a charm after I changed the include from <boost/phoenix.hpp> to <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp> . –  GuyGreer Apr 14 '13 at 13:07
    
@GuyGreer : That indicates that you're using a really outdated version of Boost. ;-] –  ildjarn Apr 27 '13 at 1:36
    
@ildjarn I don't know if 1.46.1 is 'really' old, but fair enough, this is just a version difference. –  GuyGreer Apr 27 '13 at 22:03
    
@GuyGreer : I'd say over two years old counts as 'really old', especially since a new language standard came out within that time. ;-] –  ildjarn Apr 27 '13 at 22:07

It seems to me that what you need is a std::tuple:

template <class ... Functions>
class Sum
{
    std::tuple<Functions...> functions;

public:
    Sum(Functions&& ... funcs)
      : functions( std::forward< Functions >( funcs )... )
    {
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I started with this and this answer transformed into user2279052's answer (except for using boost::fusion::tuple instead of boost::fusion::vector) –  GuyGreer Apr 14 '13 at 15:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.