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I'm running dynamic list of system commands from Perl. Sometimes, those commands are scripts that make (temporal/in-process) modifications to the environment variables. For example, consider this simple script (currently made for Windows):

Script-A-pl:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature ':5.16';

$ENV{NEW_VAR} = 'this is new var';
say "Script-A.pl can read the new var: ", `echo %NEW_VAR%`;

Output: Script-A.pl can read the new var: this is new var

Now imagine that, from Parent.pl, I need to call Script-A.pl and later Script-B.pl, which depends on the environment variable NEW_VAR. So this is how they get executed:

Parent.pl:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature ':5.16';

my @commands = ('perl Script-A.pl', 'perl Script-B.pl');

for my $i (@commands) {
    system($i);
}

That works except for the fact that the changes in the environment varialbes made by Script-A.pl cannot be seen by Script-B.pl.

I've tried different ways to call the scripts, even with IPC::Open3 opening a shell and running the list of commands there one by one, but that didn't work either.

Is there a way I can, from Parent.pl, make those changes visible to subsequent system calls?

Thanks for you comments!

Francisco

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Current value of process' environment variable –  Celada Apr 13 '13 at 2:10
    
@Celada, this is not the same question. That is about seeing changes to the system environment within a single process; this is about changes to Perl's environment persisting across multiple processes. –  dan1111 Apr 13 '13 at 7:34

1 Answer 1

%ENV represents the system environment for your Perl script, not the permanent system environment. Changes made to it only last for your script's process (and any child processes). Since you are calling all of your scripts with system, changes each one of them makes last only for the duration of that script.

To overcome this, try running all the Perl scripts in the same process rather than different processes.

my @commands = ('Script-A.pl', 'Script-B.pl', 'echo "some other command"');

for my $cmd (@commands) {
    if ($cmd =~ /\.pl$/)
    {
        do $cmd;
    }
    else
    {
        system($cmd);
    }
}

do <FILE> is a simple way to include the code from another Perl script and run it. It ensures that all your scripts will be in the same process, so changes to %ENV will persist throughout your main script.

do <FILE> gives a separate lexical variable space for each file, so you don't have to worry about variables declared with my clashing between files. However, they do share the same global variable space, so it is possible for a script that is not well-behaved (e.g. setting a special variable like $/ without using local) to mess up the behavior of other scripts when running in this way. You will need to check that everything works fine when using this method.

Another issue is, the above code assumes the Perl scripts have no arguments. If they have arguments, it won't work. You can get around this however:

my @commands = ('Script-A.pl arg1 arg2');

for my $cmd (@commands) {
    if ($cmd =~ /\.pl\b\s*(.*)$/)
    {
        local @ARGV = split ' ', $1;
        do $cmd;
    }
    else
    {
        system($cmd);
    }
}

Giving each script a local copy of @ARGV makes it looks like it is being called with arguments. This code only works for simple arguments (no spaces, no shell magic).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Not all the commands I need to run are Perl scripts, some of them are other languages scripts and some of those commands can be a simple "set X=Y". So I guess the only solution I have for that is to open a command prompt session with IPC::Open3 and start running the commands from there. Unfortunately, I lose the chance to get the exit code from each command that way. –  Francisco Zarabozo Apr 16 '13 at 5:07
    
@FranciscoZarabozo, note that this answer detects whether something is a Perl script, and runs it as a system command if it is not a Perl script. –  dan1111 Apr 16 '13 at 8:35

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