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I want to do something like this:

select value1, value2, value3, value4, count(1)
from mytable
where value1, value2, value3, value4 in
    (select value1, value2, value3, value4 from mytable
     where record_no = 1 and value5 = 'foobar')
group by value1, value2, value3, value4
having count(1)>4;

That is, I want to find values1-4 for all the groups of 1-4 that have a specific property on atleast one of their records, and I want just the groups that have have more than four records.

Update for clarification

select * from mytable;

will give you something like

value1    value2    value3   value4   record_no    value5    lots more columns
------    ------    ------   ------   ---------    ------    -----------------
aaa       bbb       ccc      ddd      1            foobar
aaa       bbb       ccc      ddd      2            abcdef
aaa       bbb       ccc      ddd      3            zzzzzz
aaa       bbb       ccc      ddd      4            barfoo
aaa       bbb       ccc      ddd      5            dsnmatr
a1        b1        c1       d1       1            foobar
a1        b1        c1       d1       2            foobar
a2        b2        c2       d2       1            barfoo
a2        b2        c2       d2       2            barfoo

I want to find the values of value1, value2, value3, value4 For all the groups of value1, value2, value3, value4, that have record 1 having 'foobar' as its value5, and where the group size is >4.

eg it should return

value1    value2    value3   value4 
------    ------    ------   ------  
aaa       bbb       ccc      ddd 
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1  
Your example makes absolutely no sense, and your explanation isn't really clear. Can you edit your question and post some sample data and the output you'd like to get from that data? –  Ken White Apr 13 '13 at 3:25
    
I've updated it. –  dwjohnston Apr 13 '13 at 3:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You were very close to begin with. This part was the problem:

where value1, value2, value3, value4 in

You have to treat value1, value2, value3, value4 as a set, so just put parentheses around them like so:

where (value1, value2, value3, value4) in

Here's the whole query; the only thing changed from your post is the parentheses:

select value1, value2, value3, value4, count(1)
from mytable
where (value1, value2, value3, value4) in
    (select value1, value2, value3, value4
    from mytable
    where record_no = 1 and value5 = 'foobar')
group by value1, value2, value3, value4
having count(1) > 4;

There's a SQL Fiddle of this here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. :) –  dwjohnston Apr 13 '13 at 4:25

When using multiple variables I often concatenate the items together with some character that does not occur, so

where value1 + '|' + value2 + '|' + value3 in (
    select value1 + '|' + value2 + '|' + value3 from ... 

if I have three fields. Equality will only be true if all the values are the same, achieving the result.

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Is the problem with this solution, that it becomes a very expensive string comparison operation? –  dwjohnston Apr 13 '13 at 4:18
    
It can be slow, but like Microsoft SQL Server don't offer multi-value in clause comparison, so you do what you need to do. I had missed the Oracle tag. It is a reason why in T-SQL I tend to add a synthetic key on complex join tables that might need such a query: I can join across the synthetic key and index the candidate keys, avoiding such constructs. –  Godeke Apr 15 '13 at 22:13

you can do it like this

select  value1, value2, value3, value4, count(*)
from    mytable
group by value1, value2, value3, value4
having  count(*) > 4 
and     sum(decode(record_no , 1 , 1 , 0)) = 1
and     sum(decode(value5 , 'foobar' , 1 , 0) = 1;

it's a little trick with decode. it's should work fine.

for educational purposes, if you don't need and actual data from the sub query (this is your case) it's a good idea to always use EXISTS. in your example it would be

select value1, value2, value3, value4, count(*)
from mytable
where exists 
    (select 1 
     from   mytable b
     where  b.record_no = 1 
     and    b.value5 = 'foobar'
     and    b.value1 = a.value1
     and    b.value2 = a.value2 
     and    b.value3 = a.value3
     and    b.value4 = a.value4
     )
group by value1, value2, value3, value4
having count(1) > 4;
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