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I config mongoDB in jave with Spring frame work. But I find it has a very low performace when I save objects. Insert such 200 records Separately needs about 7000ms.

However, when I use pymongo to do same insert operation, the speed is very fast, about 50 ms.

Is there something wrong to take 7 seconds to just insert such only 200 individual objects?

The version of mongodb is 2.4.1 and this performace test is proceed on fedora13, ubuntu 12.4 and win8.

Could someone tell me why and help me solve the problem?

the code is below:

Below code need more than 7000ms:

MongoTemplate mongoTemplate = (MongoTemplate)SpringFactory.getFactory().getBean("mongoTemplate");
for (int i = 0; i <200; i++) {
   Person person = new Person;
   person.setName("test" + i);
   person.setAge(1234665 + i);
   mongoTemplate.insert(ncbiid);
}

Below Python code need Only 50ms:

connection = Connection('127.0.0.1', 27017)
db = connection['test']
def insert(num):
    posts = db.person
    for x in range(200):
        post = {"_id" : str(x),
             "name": str(x)+"Mike",
             "age": x}
        posts.insert(post)

here is the Person Class:

@Document(collection="person")
public class Person {
    @Indexed
    String name;
    int age;

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}

here is the mongodb part of Spring xml file:

<mongo:mongo id="mongo" replica-set="127.0.0.1:27017">
    <mongo:options
         connections-per-host="8"
         threads-allowed-to-block-for-connection-multiplier="4"
         connect-timeout="1000"
         max-wait-time="1500"
         auto-connect-retry="true"
         socket-keep-alive="true"
         socket-timeout="1500"
         slave-ok="true"
         write-number="1"
         write-timeout="0"
         write-fsync="true"/>       
</mongo:mongo>

<mongo:db-factory dbname="test" mongo-ref="mongo"/>

<bean id="mongoTemplate" class="org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate">
    <constructor-arg name="mongoDbFactory" ref="mongoDbFactory"/>
</bean>

<mongo:mapping-converter base-package="com.database.model" />

<mongo:repositories base-package="com.database.mongorepo"/>
share|improve this question
1  
I find the solution. just change the mongodb config parameter in spring xml file. from write-fsync="true" to write-fsync="false" and everything is ok now. –  user2276614 Apr 13 '13 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

mongoOps.insert(ncbiid);

Doing that 200 times is 200 individual inserts.

mongoTemplate.insert(lsPersons, "person");

That once is one batch insert of 200 records.

If you batch them it means fewer round trips to the database and better performance.

This is the java doc for MongoTemplate , and it tells you that one is a batch operation.

share|improve this answer
    
but when I persistent several objects which may have relationship, it may hard to insert these objects batched. Since many person says mongdb has a very high performance on insert, does 200 individual insert takes 7000ms may a little slow? –  user2276614 Apr 13 '13 at 4:33
    
Sounds like you want to use transactions / batch operations to improve performance. Unfortunately, many NoSQL databases don't support things like that. From what I can tell, MongoDB (at least with spring) is one of those. On the upside, the single inserts should still be faster than single inserts would be with a relational database. –  CorayThan Apr 13 '13 at 4:39
    
That's 35 ms per insert. You should probably test a realistic number of inserts that could happen from one user action. That's how long a user would have to wait. If that takes an unacceptably long time, then perhaps MongoDB isn't the right database for your use case. –  CorayThan Apr 13 '13 at 4:41
    
Thanks for your answer. But what I wander is whether it is normal to spend 7 seconds to do only 200 seperate insert. –  user2276614 Apr 13 '13 at 4:45

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