Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to define some global variables above your functions on the same .html page?

    <script type="text/javascript">

        birthYear = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
        birthMonth = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthMonth.ClientID %>');
        birthDay = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');

        function ValidateCardField(validator, args)
        {
            if (args.Value.length > 0)
    	        args.IsValid = true;
            else
    	        args.IsValid = false;
    	}
...

I'm getting nulls for the variable values.

share|improve this question
    
Isn't that exactly how you do it? What kind of problem are you running into? –  Daniel T. Oct 21 '09 at 3:20
    
Erm, yes it is. I do this on a regular basis. Can't help but feel though that this is not the actual question. –  griegs Oct 21 '09 at 3:21
    
after moving duplicates of these lines out of my functions, now I'm not getting my asp.net validationsummary control to fire. Just wanted to check if globals like this are ok in JavaScript. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 21 '09 at 3:22
    
Updaed original post. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 21 '09 at 3:32
    
Please show us how you're using those 3 defined variables. I honestly don't see how you expect anyone to answer without providing the full source code. –  meder Oct 21 '09 at 3:42
show 1 more comment

8 Answers 8

Yes it is possible to have global variables, and you seem to be doing it correctly (although you should probably be using the var keyword to define them). The problem you are currently facing is that you are trying to access elements in the DOM before they have been rendered. What you need to do is define your variables globally, and then wait for the page to load before assigning them to the appropriate DOM elements...

var birthYear, birthMonth, birthDay;

window.onload = function() {
  birthYear = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
  birthMonth = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthMonth.ClientID %>');
  birthDay = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
}

Now the variables will be globally accessible after the page loads.

share|improve this answer
    
I tested this and it's correct. –  Mike Blandford Oct 21 '09 at 3:53
    
onload will work, but will fire later than DOMContentLoaded (or the framework abstractions doing the same thing). If some resources have not yet loaded by the time the user causes a function requiring these to be called, it will fail. –  Jonathan Fingland Oct 21 '09 at 3:58
add comment

Your problem may be that the script is being executed before the DOM has been fully initialized. So when these lines of code run:

    birthYear = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
    birthMonth = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthMonth.ClientID %>');
    birthDay = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');

no elements with those IDs exist yet, as far as the browser is concerned. One way to fix that would be to declare the variables as null, and then initialize them in a function that you call in the page's (client-side!) load handler.

It's probably also worth checking (by viewing the source in your browser) that those ClientID values are what you think they are, and that elements with those IDs really do exist in the rendered HTML.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The var keyword in Javascript means those variables are not global (global being unfortunately the default) but function-scoped -- not much point in using var outside of any function's scope (and potentially confusing), though it's legal. But the beauty of var and function scopes is to allow you to define rich closures, one of the truly beautiful aspects of Javascript -- i.e., if you example code is defined inside some outer function, and the outerfunction returns ValidateCardField or an object having the latter as one of its value, that inner function will get to access the non-global variables defined in its outer function, while the rest of the world is shielded off from them -- a much better way to do "private fields" than the Java/C++ approach of private as a keyword...!

share|improve this answer
    
so if I moved them outside my functions and at the top right before my javascript script tag, then they must not be able to access them then. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 21 '09 at 3:29
    
-1 While your insight is precise, the answer does not help him with his problem. –  Josh Stodola Oct 21 '09 at 3:40
    
@coffeeaddict, of course they must be inside a script tag -- otherwise they'll be taken as text for HTML formatting, not as JS statements! What do you mean "before" your script tag?! If they're inside said tag, and outside of function scope, they'll be accessible throughout and the var keyword's redundant. @Josh, tx for explaining the downvote -- even though I disagree with you, I respect you for explaining, much as I despise anonymous, unexplaining downvoters!-) –  Alex Martelli Oct 21 '09 at 4:22
add comment

EDIT

I see what the problem is. The DOM hasn't completely loaded when you're calling those in the global context (when it was called from the function, the DOM had already loaded).

In this case, you are probably best off using a framework like jQuery or Prototype.

See http://docs.jquery.com/Events/ready for running code after the DOM is loaded in jQuery and http://www.prototypejs.org/api/document/observe for prototype

e.g. in jQuery:

 $(document).ready(function () {
    birthYear = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
    birthMonth = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthMonth.ClientID %>');
    birthDay = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
 });

and in Prototype:

 document.observe("dom:loaded", function() {
    birthYear = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
    birthMonth = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthMonth.ClientID %>');
    birthDay = document.getElementById('<%=ddlBirthYear.ClientID %>');
 });
share|improve this answer
    
I want all functions to have access to those 3 variables –  CoffeeAddict Oct 21 '09 at 3:33
add comment

Yes, it's possible to declare global variables but they are within the same namespace as the function definitions, if the variables are not defined in the function bodies and accessed inside, they descend upwards and reach the global/outer scope variables and use those.

OP - you should try moving your <script> block to right before the end body tag, that or adopt a domready/onload function.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by namespace? I've just got a bunch of Javascript functions inside a script tag in my ASP.NET .aspx page. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 21 '09 at 3:23
add comment

The issue isn't one of scoping, but one of execution order. In your original implementation, the DOM elements aren't retrieved until the function is fired. Now, the elements are looked-up as soon as the JavaScript is parsed, which is presumably before the document (and hence, the elements) are loaded - hence they are null when the function is invoked.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think the problem is not related to the scope of variables, but to when you try to assign them with references to some page elements. Probably the script is running before all the page elements have been loaded. So the getElementById function will fail when trying to find an element that does not exist. Wrap your script in the onLoad event of the window object, like this:

window.onload = function () (
     // Your code here ...
);
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're unsure about this kind of thing, you can write up a quick test program and test it.

<html><head>
<script type="text/javascript">
var x = document.getElementById("bob");

function helloWorld(){
    alert(x == null);
}
</script>
</head>
<body onload="javascript:helloWorld();">
<div id="bob">hello back!</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.