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I'm trying to build a simple login module for Node. I'm trying to do it in a TDD way, but I'm still new to it, so any tips or resources that will help me understand it better would be great.

My problem comes when I query a database with invalid data, and I'm expecting an error. The error is thrown if I test the app manually - which is great. However when I try to test it with Mocha and Expect.js, I get Error: expected fn to throw an exception. If I switch the code from to.throwError() to to.not.throwError() the errors are thrown properly. I think the problem is coming in somewhere with my attempts at asynchronous tests and error handling. The first test passes fine.

Thanks for taking a look.

New code based on SebastianG's instructions

login.js

var MongoClient = require('mongodb').MongoClient;

exports.login = function(callback, email, password) {

    MongoClient.connect("mongodb://localhost:27017/stockalertDev", function(err, db) {
        if (err) {

            return err;
        }

        var collection = db.collection('users');
        if (email) {
            collection.findOne({email:email}, function(err, item) {
            try {   
                if (err) {
                    console.log('error');
                    throw new Error('error finding email');

                } else {

                        if (item) {
                            if (item.password == password) {
                            console.log('logged in');
                            //callback(null, item);
                            //return item;
                            } else {
                                console.log('here');
                                throw new Error('Email and password not matching');
                            }
                        } else {
                            throw new Error('Email not found');
                        }
                    } 
            } catch (err) {
                console.log('catch error here');
                callback(err, null);
            } finally {
                console.log('finally here');
                callback(null, item);
            }

            });
        }

    });
}

test/login-test.js

var expect = require('expect.js'),
    assert = require('assert'),
    mocha = require('mocha'),
    mongo = require('mongodb');


var login = require('../login');

describe('login', function() {
    it('should login a real user', function(done) {
        expect(function() {
            login.login(function(err, item) {
                //console.log(item);
                if (err) throw err;

                done();
            }, 'email', 'password')
        }).to.not.throwError();
    });
    it('should error on unfound email', function(done) {
        expect(function() {
            login.login(function(err, item) {
                console.log(err);
                if (err) throw err;
                done();
            }, 'ert','wqew')
        }).to.throwError();

    }); 
    it('should error on incorrect match', function(done) {
        expect(function() {
            login.login(function(err, item) {
                console.log(err);
                throw err;
                done();
            }, 'email','wqew')
        }).to.throwError();
    });
});

Old code

login.js

var MongoClient = require('mongodb').MongoClient;

exports.login = function(email, password, callback, errCallback) {

    MongoClient.connect("mongodb://localhost:27017/stockalertDev", function(err, db) {
        if (err) {

            return err;
        }

        var collection = db.collection('users');
        if (email) {
            collection.findOne({email:email}, function(err, item) {
            try {   
                if (err) {
                    console.log('error');
                    throw new Error('error finding email');
                    errCallback(err);
                } else {

                        if (item) {
                            if (item.password == password) {
                            console.log('logged in');
                            callback(item);
                            //return item;
                            } else {
                                console.log('here');
                                throw new Error('Email and password not matching');
                            }
                        } else {
                            throw new Error('Email not found');
                        }
                    } 
            } catch (err) {
                errCallback(err);
            }
            });
        }

    });
}

test/login-test.js

var expect = require('expect.js'),
    assert = require('assert'),
    mocha = require('mocha'),
    mongo = require('mongodb');


var login = require('../login');

describe('login', function() {
    it('should login a real user', function(done) {
        assert.doesNotThrow(function() {
            login.login('email','password',function() {
                done();
            }, function(err) {
                if (err) throw err;
                done();
            });
        });
    });
    it('should error on unfound email', function(done) {
        expect( function() { 
            login.login('atreq','a', function() {
                console.log('true');        
            }, function(err) {
                console.log(err);
                throw err;
        })}).to.throwError();

    }); 
    it('should error on incorrect match', function(done) {
        expect(function() {
            login.login('email','apassword', function() {
                console.log('true');
                done();
            }, function(err) {
                console.log(err);
                throw err;
            })
        }).to.throwError();
    });
});
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using exeptions in asynchronous Node code is a bad idea (at least for the moment). There is a concept called Domains which could help you but is extremely experimental yet.

I suggest to do it the Node way: Reserve the first parameter of your callback for errors. Small example:

function getUserData(cb) {
    var userData = // ...
    if (userData === null) {
        cb(new Error('Something bad happend.'));
    } else {
        cb(null, userData)
    }
}

If you want to use a errorCallback as you already do use it:

errCallback(new Error('Email not found'));

Than you can do something like this (most testing frameworks provide helper methods for this, however I'm not that familar with Mocha and it's modules):

it('should login a real user', function(done) {
    login.login(function(err, item) {
        expect(err).to.be(null);
        expect(item).not.to.be(null);
        done();
    }, 'email', 'password');
});


it('should error on unfound email', function(done) {
    login.login(function(err, item) {
        expect(err).not.to.be(null);
        expect(item).to.be(null);
        done();
    }, 'ert','wqew');
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I've tried to refactor my code to how you suggested, but I'm not quite sure how to do the tests. I've rewritten them with the callback as the first parameter and with an if (err) throw err, but I'm still getting the same error: expected fn to throw an exception. I'll update my original post with the new code as how I interpreted your instructions. Thanks so much for the help. –  matt Apr 13 '13 at 23:20
    
You are still thinking in the synchronous throwing approach :) What you really want to test is that the callback's error argument is null or an error, depending on the test. I added a draft to my answer. However, I haven't worked with Mocha and expect.js, so don't expect it to work this way. It is just an idea. –  SebastianG Apr 14 '13 at 10:42
    
Amazing - it worked with expect(err).to.be.a(Error) as you suggested. Thanks so much for your help! I owe you one for sure. –  matt Apr 14 '13 at 11:22

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