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I would like to create a compare function object that will help me sort a vector of a custom data structure. I am struggling to work out where exactly it should be implemented and any additional code required since I am using a template at the same time. Most of the code below can be ignored. It is included for completeness but the compare function object is used at the very end of printSummary(). In a nutshell, how do I implement the compare function object?

#include<map>
#include<vector>
//#include<iostream>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class Record{
   public:
   T item;
   int total;
};

   template<class T>
   bool compare(const Record<T> & a, const Record<T> & b){ //should a come before b?
      if(a.total > b.total)
         return true;
      if(a.total < b.total)
         return false;
      if(a.total == b.total){
         if(a.item < b.item)
            return true; 
         else
            return false;
      }
   }

template <class T>
class Counter{
   public:
      map<T, int> m;

   void printSummary(){

      typename map<T, int>::const_iterator itr; 
      vector< Record<T> > printlist;
      Record<T> temp;
      int i = 0;

      for( itr = m.begin(); itr != m.end(); ++itr ){
         temp.item = (*itr).first;
         temp.total = (*itr).second;
         printlist.push_back(temp);
         i++;
      }

      sort(printlist.begin(), printlist.end(), compare);

      //output sorted printlist contents
   }

};
share|improve this question
2  
What is the question? – Andy Prowl Apr 13 '13 at 13:34
    
Where should I put/how should I code compare() so it can be accessed by sort() – user1905552 Apr 13 '13 at 13:39
    
It's OK to put it there. Just specify an instantiation when passing it to sort(). See my answer – Andy Prowl Apr 13 '13 at 13:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your call to sort(), you are specifying the name of a function template without instantiating it:

sort(printlist.begin(), printlist.end(), compare);
//                                       ^^^^^^^

The bare name of a function template represents a whole overload set for the compiler (where the set includes all the possible specializations of that template).

To disambiguate, you need to instantiate compare<>() in order to provide the address of one function:

sort(printlist.begin(), printlist.end(), compare<T>);
//                                              ^^^

Alternatively, you can make compare a functor:

struct compare
{
   template<class T>
   bool operator () (const Record<T> & a, const Record<T> & b)
   {
      // should a come before b?
      if(a.total > b.total)
         return true;
      if(a.total < b.total)
         return false;
      if(a.total == b.total){
         if(a.item < b.item)
            return true; 
         else
            return false;
      }
   }
};

Then, you can pass it to sort() this way, without template instantiation (but you need to create an instance of your functor, although a temporary is fine, as shown below):

sort(printlist.begin(), printlist.end(), compare());
//                                       ^^^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer
    
Can the same point can be made for instantiating a Record object? I needed to specify Record<T> so the compiler knows to use template<class T> (which I did do in the example) as opposed to some other template say template<class U> – user1905552 Apr 13 '13 at 14:01
    
@user1905552: I think I do not understand your question, can you rephrase? – Andy Prowl Apr 13 '13 at 14:03
    
Can I try a different question. If I use the first solution you mention, could I have compare<U> in sort()? Could I then write a new compare function object under template<class U> potentially containing different logic? – user1905552 Apr 13 '13 at 14:30
    
@user1905552: I still don't understand. If you are just replacing T by U, that's a no-change. T and U are only symbolic names for the type parameter of the Counter template – Andy Prowl Apr 13 '13 at 14:31

This looks fine so far, you must only qualify compare with the type T

sort(printlist.begin(), printlist.end(), compare<T>);

In your compare function, you can omit

if(a.total == b.total){

because at that point, it is always equal. You can reduce this to just

if (a.total > b.total)
    return true;

if (a.total < b.total)
    return false;

return a.item < b.item;
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