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I'm supporting a C++ application written using Borland C++ Builder 5.02 (from 1997). The find() method on the Borland string class does not behave how I would expect:

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
   string needle = "length == eighteen";
   string haystack = "<" + needle + ">";
   if (haystack.find(needle) != NPOS)
      cout << "Found it!" << endl;
   else
      cout << "Not found" << endl;

   return 0;
}

This program outputs Not found. If I change the needle to something shorter it outputs Found it!. If I exchange the angle brackets for some other characters it finds it. Spaces work, but parentheses also don't.

Note that I am using the Borland string library here: if I #include <string> and use std::string instead then it works exactly how I would expect. Sadly changing the whole application to use STL strings is not a feasible answer!

From the documentation it seems that Borland uses a hash-based algorithm for string search. I can't find any more details about this, and I've stepped through the disassembly but am not much the wiser.

I find it very hard to believe that this is really a bug in the string library, particularly since if it were then I would expect to be able to find an article or something about it. I can't find any such information.

However, I've run out of ideas! Is this a known bug? Is there a fix?

EDIT: Having looked again at the disassembly, I think it's trying to do something like the Rabin-Karp algorithm, where the hash function is calculated mod 33554393 (the largest prime < 2^25). It could well be the polynomial hash function with a base of 32 (i.e. a_0 + 32 a_1 + 32^2 a_2 + .. + 32^n a_n) but that's just a hunch. Sounds like a possible overflow as Daniel Fischer suggested.

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2  
"hash-based algorithm", "If I change the needle to something shorter" <- that smells of integer overflow. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 13 '13 at 13:53
1  
This is what happens when you rely on 15 year old compilers. Time to move on. –  David Heffernan Apr 13 '13 at 13:54
1  
@PeterWood It can be difficult to stay put when there's no budget –  David Heffernan Apr 13 '13 at 14:06
1  
@DavidHeffernan This question has arisen as part of a project to migrate this (completely working and very profitable) system over to a more modern compiler. 'Moving on' is what we're doing. But it has to keep on working exactly as it currently does, and pragmatictips.com/26 tells me to suspect my own errors over library bugs as the former are astonishingly more likely. Hence the question. –  Dave Turner Apr 13 '13 at 14:15
1  
@DavidHeffernan I don't care about fixing the library. If it's a known library bug then we can justify changing the application to work around it (e.g. using strstr()) and migrate the altered code. What amazed me was that I couldn't find any evidence that this was a known library bug. –  Dave Turner Apr 13 '13 at 14:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have found a reference from 1998 suggesting Borland's implementation of searching strings has a bug:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!searchin/borland.public.cpp.language/cstring$20bug/borland.public.cpp.language/XBzjaJmCYpk/gtMPm-j8jugJ

Also, it appears that at some point in history the C++ commitee decided that a string class would be part of standard C++, and cstring's string class is a remnant of this:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!searchin/borland.public.cpp.language/borland$20cstring/borland.public.cpp.language/2psY2seRmS4/ywVrqwU1C2wJ

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If you have the original BC++ 5.02 installation disk, the string class source is found under BC5\SOURCE\RTL\SOURCE\STRING.

Here is an excerpt from the code of the string::find_case_index() function (called by string::find() ):

const long q = 33554393L;
const long q32 = q<<5;

size_t testlength = length() - startindex;
size_t patternlength = patl = strlen(cp);
if( testlength < patternlength )
    return NPOS;
if( patternlength == 0 )
    return 0;

long patternHash = 0;
long testHash = 0;

const char _FAR *testP = c_str()+startindex;
const char _FAR *patP = cp;
long x = 1;
size_t i = patternlength-1;

while( i-- )
    x = (x<<5)%q;

for( i=0; i<patternlength; i++ )
    {
    patternHash = ( (patternHash<<5) + *patP++  ) % q;
    testHash    = ( (testHash   <<5) + *testP++ ) % q;
    }

testP = c_str()+startindex;
const char _FAR *end = testP + testlength - patternlength;

while (1)
    {

    if(testHash == patternHash)
        if( !get_paranoid_check_flag() ||
            !strncmp( testP, cp, patternlength) )
          return (size_t)(testP-c_str());

    if( testP >= end )
        break;

    // Advance & calculate the new hash value:
    testHash = ( testHash + q32 - *testP * x                 ) % q;
    testHash = ( (testHash<<5)  + *(patternlength + testP++) ) % q;
    }
return NPOS;          // Not found.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's awesome. I'm sure there's an installation CD knocking around somewhere; I never even thought of looking on it for source. –  Dave Turner Apr 14 '13 at 14:50
    
If you find the CD and decide to try to apply a fix to the source, look here for instructions how to build the RTL, along with a fix to another bug: jogy.net/bcrtlfix.html –  Jogy Apr 14 '13 at 15:06
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You are not using a Borland string library. String (capital S) is the Borland string class. string (lowercase s), which is the exact same thing as std::string, is the STL string class, which is NOT a Borland implementation (the STL in BCB5 was the RogueWave STL). Your use of #include <cstring> is likely bringing std::string into the global namespace, which is why your code compiles. But you really should be using #include <string> and std::string instead. As for NPOS, you should be using string::npos instead, since that is what string::find() actually returns.

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
   string needle = "length == eighteen";
   string haystack = "<" + needle + ">";
   if (haystack.find(needle) != string::npos)
      cout << "Found it!" << endl;
   else
      cout << "Not found" << endl;

   return 0;
}

Or:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
   std::string needle = "length == eighteen";
   std::string haystack = "<" + needle + ">";
   if (haystack.find(needle) != std::string::npos)
      std::cout << "Found it!" << std::endl;
   else
      std::cout << "Not found" << std::endl;

   return 0;
}
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Can you repro the fault? –  David Heffernan Apr 13 '13 at 18:28
    
I'm not sure we're talking about the same version of the class library. I can't find a String class in my system and the string I'm using is definitely not std::string - e.g. it has a contains() method whereas my std::string does not. The class library docs are definitely about a string class. Neither of your programs compile for me: the first says undefined symbol 'npos' and your second says 'cout' is not a member of 'std'. [... TBC] –  Dave Turner Apr 13 '13 at 19:40
    
[contd ...] You say you have BCB5 installed - is this 5.02 or the freely available 5.5? Can you compile and run the program I gave and, if so, do you see the same output? That would be most helpful. –  Dave Turner Apr 13 '13 at 19:42
    
@DaveTurner: I don't think we are even talking about the same product. You said you are using Borland C++ Builder (which is what I have installed), but I think you are actually using Borland C++ instead. They are NOT the same product. In Borland C++, cstring.h defined a non-standard string class that is not the STL std::string class. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 14 '13 at 7:33
    
@DaveTurner: Borland C++ Builder uses the STL std::string class, and its VCL framework also defines a separate System::String class that is binary-compatible with Delphi. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 14 '13 at 7:40
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