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I have a table of products with a score column, which has a B-Tree Index on it. I have a query which returns products that have not been shown to the user in the current session. I can't simply use simple pagination with LIMIT for it, because the result should be ordered by the score column, which can change between query calls.

My current solution works like this:

SELECT * 
FROM products p 
LEFT JOIN product_seen ps 
  ON (ps.session_id = ? AND p.product_id = ps.product_id )
WHERE ps.product_id is null
ORDER BY p.score DESC
LIMIT 30;

This works fine for the first few pages, but the response time grows linear to the number of products already shown in the session and hits the second mark by the time this number reaches ~300. Is there a way to fasten this up in MySQL? Or should I solve this problem in an entirely other way?


Edit: These are the two tables:

CREATE TABLE `products` (
 `product_id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `shop` varchar(15) NOT NULL,
 `shop_id` varchar(25) NOT NULL,
 `shop_category_id` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
 `shop_subcategory_id` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
 `shop_designer_id` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
 `shop_designer_name` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
 `created_at` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
 `product_url` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
 `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
 `description` mediumtext NOT NULL,
 `price_cents` int(10) NOT NULL,
 `list_image_url` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
 `list_image_height` int(4) NOT NULL,
 `ending` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
 `category_id` int(5) NOT NULL,
 `last_update` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
 `included_at` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
 `hearts` int(5) NOT NULL,
 `score` decimal(10,5) NOT NULL,
 `rand_field` decimal(16,15) NOT NULL,
 `last_score_update` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
 `active` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
 PRIMARY KEY (`product_id`),
 UNIQUE KEY `unique_shop_id` (`shop`,`shop_id`),
 KEY `score_index` (`active`,`score`),
 KEY `included_at_index` (`included_at`),
 KEY `active_category_score` (`active`,`category_id`,`score`),
 KEY `active_category` (`active`,`category_id`,`product_id`),
 KEY `active_products` (`active`,`product_id`),
 KEY `active_rand` (`active`,`rand_field`),
 KEY `active_category_rand` (`active`,`category_id`,`rand_field`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=55985 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

CREATE TABLE `product_seen` (
 `seenby_id` int(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `session_id` varchar(25) NOT NULL,
 `product_id` int(15) NOT NULL,
 `last_seen` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
 `sorting` varchar(10) NOT NULL,
 `in_category` int(3) DEFAULT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY (`seenby_id`),
 KEY `last_seen_index` (`last_seen`),
 KEY `session_id` (`session_id`,`seenby_id`),
 KEY `session_id_2` (`session_id`,`sorting`,`seenby_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=17431 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8


Edit 2:
The query above is a simplification, this is the real query with EXPLAIN:

EXPLAIN SELECT 
    DISTINCT p.product_id AS id, 
    p.list_image_url AS image, 
    p.list_image_height AS list_height, 
    hearts, 
    active AS available, 
    (UNIX_TIMESTAMP( ) - ulp.last_action) AS last_loved
FROM `looksandgoods`.`products` p
LEFT JOIN `looksandgoods`.`user_likes_products` ulp 
ON ( p.product_id = ulp.product_id AND ulp.user_id =1 )
LEFT JOIN `looksandgoods`.`product_seen` sb 
ON (sb.session_id = 'y7lWunZKKABgMoDgzjwDjZw1' 
    AND sb.sorting = 'trend'
    AND p.product_id = sb.product_id )
WHERE p.active =1
AND sb.product_id IS NULL
ORDER BY p.score DESC
LIMIT 30 ;


Explain output, there is still a temp table and filesort, although the keys for the join exist:

+----+-------------+-------+-------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------+---------+----------------------------------+------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys                                                                                      | key              | key_len | ref                              | rows | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------+---------+----------------------------------+------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | range | score_index,active_category_score,active_category,active_products,active_rand,active_category_rand | score_index      | 1       | NULL                             | 2299 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ulp   | ref   | love_count_index,user_to_product_index,product_id                                                  | love_count_index | 9       | looksandgoods.p.product_id,const |    1 |                                              |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | sb    | ref   | session_id,session_id_2                                                                            | session_id       | 77      | const                            |  711 | Using where; Not exists; Distinct            |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------+---------+----------------------------------+------+----------------------------------------------+
share|improve this question
    
Don't use a completely dynamic Score. Recalculate DisplayScore every hour/day/whatever from Score and use DisplayScore to select each batch of items to display. I don't think you can do better than that. –  Pieter Geerkens Apr 13 '13 at 14:38
    
Difficult to answer without knowing the table definitions. What does an EXPLAIN yield for that query? –  Aya Apr 13 '13 at 14:52
    
What does the sb table alias refer to? –  Ross Smith II Apr 13 '13 at 20:04
    
Sorry, this was a mistake, it should be "ps". @Aya: What do you need from the table description? I thought only the primary key and the indexed score column are of interest here. –  Thomas Apr 15 '13 at 14:02
    
Well, there may be a way to restructure or reindex the tables to improve the performance of the query. If you include the output of SHOW CREATE TABLE products and SHOW CREATE TABLE product_seen, it would help. –  Aya Apr 15 '13 at 14:10
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

New answer

I think the problem with the real query is the DISTINCT clause. The implication is that either or both of the product_seen and user_likes_products tables can join multiple rows for each product_id which could potentially appear in the result set (given the somewhat disturbing lack of UNIQUE KEYs on the product_seen table), and this is the reason you've included the DISTINCT clause. Unfortunately, it also means MySQL will have to create a temp table to process the query.

Before I go any further, if it's possible to do...

ALTER TABLE product_seen ADD UNIQUE KEY (session_id, product_id, sorting);

...and...

ALTER TABLE user_likes_products ADD UNIQUE KEY (user_id, product_id);

...then the DISTINCT clause is redundant, and removing it should eliminate the problem. N.B. I'm not suggesting you necessarily need to add these keys, but rather just to confirm that these fields are always unique.

If it's not possible, then there may be another solution, but I'd need to know a lot more about the tables involved in the joins.

Old answer

An EXPLAIN for your query yields...

+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------------+---------+-------+------+-------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key        | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra                   |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------------+---------+-------+------+-------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | ALL  | NULL          | NULL       | NULL    | NULL  |   10 | Using filesort          |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ps    | ref  | session_id    | session_id | 27      | const |    1 | Using where; Not exists |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------------+---------+-------+------+-------------------------+

...which shows it's not using an index on the products table, so it's having to do a table scan and a filesort, which is why it's slow.

I noticed there's an index on (active, score) which you could use by changing the query to only show active products...

SELECT *
FROM products p
LEFT JOIN product_seen ps
  ON (ps.session_id = ? AND p.product_id = ps.product_id )
WHERE p.active=TRUE AND ps.product_id is null
ORDER BY p.score DESC
LIMIT 30;

...which changes the EXPLAIN to...

+----+-------------+-------+-------+-----------------------------+-------------+---------+-------+------+-------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys               | key         | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra                   |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+-----------------------------+-------------+---------+-------+------+-------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | range | score_index,active_products | score_index | 1       | NULL  |   10 | Using where             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ps    | ref   | session_id                  | session_id  | 27      | const |    1 | Using where; Not exists |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+-----------------------------+-------------+---------+-------+------+-------------------------+

...which is now doing a range scan and no filesort, which should be much faster.

Or if you want it to also return inactive products, then you'll need to add an index on score only, with...

ALTER TABLE products ADD KEY (score);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is a good hint. Unfortunately my query is a little more complex and still needs a temp table and filesort. I updated my question with these informations. –  Thomas Apr 18 '13 at 0:55
    
@Thomas see updated answer –  Aya Apr 18 '13 at 11:36
    
Thank you for your answer. Removing the DISTINCT clause helped to speed the thing up, but it's still getting slow after ~20-30 pages seen. I think I have to go with a caching solution. –  Thomas Apr 20 '13 at 13:07
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