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This is a piece of the code that I'm trying to do:

String intro = "Test String";
System.out.println("===============");  //Line 1
System.out.println(intro);              //Line 2
System.out.println("===============");  //Line 3

I was "animating" the intro, i.e. I use a loop to move the string one space to the right for each iteration. So for example, first time is "Test String", second time will be " Test String". I also use Thread.sleep() function to delay the animation. However, I couldn't print the Line 3 until the for loop finishes. Is there a way to do that? Thanks.

EDIT:

This function is used to move the string:

public String moveChar(String a){
    char temp=' ';
    char[] charOfA = new char[50];
    charOfA = a.toCharArray();
    temp = a.charAt(a.length()-1);

    for (int i = a.length()-1; i > 0; i--) {

        charOfA[i] = charOfA[i-1];

    }
    charOfA[0] = temp;
    a = new String(charOfA);
    return a;
}

then the one on Main is:

System.out.println("==================================");
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    intro = moveChar(intro);
    System.out.print(intro);
    System.out.print("\r");
    sleep(1000);
}
System.out.println("==================================");

Sleep function is just Thread.sleep(int milliseconds); with try-catch surrounding it.

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can you paste the code that you have tried out ? –  Ankur Shanbhag Apr 13 '13 at 14:47
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! Can you add your loop and sleep() code as well please? –  DeltaLima Apr 13 '13 at 14:48
4  
No, it is not possible with a simple println. You'd need special terminal control characters for that, which are specific to a terminal emulator this is run in. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 13 '13 at 14:48

1 Answer 1

You could print backspace \b and erase whatever you printed to simulate an animation.

        String x = "Test String";
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            System.out.print(x);
            int len = x.length();
            for (int j = 0; j < len; j++)
            {
                System.out.print('\b');
            }
            x = " " + x;
        }

I have no idea if this will work on all platforms. Seems to work on a Win7 command line.

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