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This seems like it should be really simple, but I've been playing and havn't found the solution I'm looking for yet, so here goes:

I have the following struct (simplified for illustrative purposes of course):

template<typename T>
struct test
    {
    using L = std::list<T>;
    L::iterator a;
    };

Now, this throws the error:

error: need 'typename' before 'test<T>::K::iterator' because 'test<T>::K' is a dependent scope

The two ways I have found of fixing it so far are both less than ideal:

1) add typename before any use of L:

template<typename T>
struct test
    {
    using L = std::list<T>;
    typename L::iterator a;
    };

I'd rather avoid the extra verbosity of this if possible.

2) add another using statement to target the iterator directly:

template<typename T>
struct test
    {
    using L = std::list<T>;
    using iter = typename L::iterator;
    iter a;
    };

But that would require having to do the same for every iterator I wanted to use, if I also wished to access the const_iterator etc etc, and I'd rather not have to define a bunch of using statements.

So, is there a way to write the using statement that then allows me to write:

 L::iterator a;
 L::const_iterator b;
 ...

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

The typename must be there, but you can use a couple of alias template utilities to avoid defining a new iter type every time:

template<typename C>
using Iterator = typename C::iterator;

template<typename C>
using ConstIterator = typename C::const_iterator;

template<typename T>
struct test
{
    using L = std::list<T>;
    Iterator<L> i;
    ConstIterator<L> ci;
};
share|improve this answer
    
That is better than my meta approach, +1! – Yakk Apr 13 '13 at 15:34
    
Thanks for the answer! In light of not being able to do it my preferred way, this looks to be the cleanest way to go about it :) – jsdw Apr 13 '13 at 15:39
    
@lytnus: Glad it helped :) – Andy Prowl Apr 13 '13 at 15:41

Nope, there is not. All dependent types must either be prefaced with typename, or be brought in via a preface with typename.

Now, you could create a list_iter<T> using declartion somewhere:

template<typename T>
using list_iter = typename std::list<T>::iterator;

or even a meta-iter using statement:

template<template<typename>class container, typename T>
using iter = typename container<T>::iterator;
template<template<typename>class container, typename T>
using const_iter = typename container<T>::const_iterator;

which would let you do:

struct test {
  using L = std::list<T>;
  iter<std::list,T> a;
};

where I've "hidden" the typename in a using declaration outside of the struct.

As an aside, 99% of the time std::list is the wrong container.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think this would not work, because std::list also accepts an additional allocator type parameter (which has a default argument) – Andy Prowl Apr 13 '13 at 15:36
    
Thanks for your answer! As for using a list, It's going to be a potentially very large list of symbols that will often need to be removed or inserted at locations saved somewhere else (so traversing the list to find them is no concern); I think this is one of those 1% cases :) – jsdw Apr 13 '13 at 15:38
    
If you are traversing the list to find them before deleting them, and they aren't all clustered at or near the front of the list, then vector remains more efficient. For list to win out, you basically need to be adding and deleting elements from it without traversing to find the elements, because the cost of "shifting" the elements down in a vector is often cheaper than the cost of traversing a list! (expensive to move (ie, no move, and large copies) elements can also make list more tempting, but even then deque wins out...) If you have not profiled, you are wrong. – Yakk Apr 13 '13 at 16:21

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