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I've recently realized that

loadNibNamed:owner:

is deprecated in 10.8 and therefore have started switching it to

loadNibNamed:owner:topLevelObjects:

I'm using ARC and since this new version now allows my controller to keep strong references to all top-level objects in my nib, would it makes sense to change my outlet connections to top-level objects to weak references (for those objects who support weak references, of course)?

This would be solely to be consistent with other outlets, I do understand that there's nothing wrong (in this case) with holding two strong references for the same object.

I'm not asking about the general case of using IBOutlets and ARC, I'm asking specifically about when loading the nib via the new 10.8 method to see if it changes the rule of having to hold to the top-level objects using strong outlets.

Thoughts?

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@GabrielePetronella I'd consider keeping this open as a non-duplicate, since there is a nuance in working with loadNibNamed::owner:topLevelObjects: in this case. Specifically, the issue of what happens if you drop the topLevelObjects array. –  gaige Apr 13 '13 at 23:55
    
I would agree. It's related to the question linked but my question is specific to the use of the new 10.8 method and not to the use of ARC with IBOutlets in general. –  Didier Malenfant Apr 14 '13 at 0:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's going to depend a lot on what you are doing with the topLevelObjects array pointer. Once that's in your hands, you either need to hold on to the whole array, or you need strong references to each of the objects in the array in order to make sure that you don't lose anything.

If you're going to hold the array, it's safe to use weak references to the top level objects. If you don't, you must hold strong ones.

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I'm planning on holding on to the entire array inside the controller so this pretty much confirms what I thought. –  Didier Malenfant Apr 14 '13 at 0:40

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