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I'm writing code for a project to determine the validity of credit cards and i've hit a wall, it seems like all of the things i have tried so far are not working.

This is giving me an error for the sumofodds function where j=int(card[i])

The error is "Invalid Literal for Int() with Base 10

Is there anyone that can give me some advce?

def sumofdoubles():
    card=input()
    x=len(card)
    summ=0

    for i in range(x-2,-1,-2):
        j=int(card[i])
        u=j+j

        if u>9:
            h=u/2
            summ=summ+h

     return(summ)

def sumofevens():
    card=input()
    x=len(card)
    summ=0

    for i in range(x-2,-1,-2):
        j=int(card[i])
        u=j+j
        if u<9:
            summ=summ+u

    return(summ)


def sumofodds():
    summ=0
    card=input()
    x=len(card)

    for i in range(x-1,-1,-2):
        j=int(card[i])
        summ=summ+j

    return(summ)

def main():
    card=input()
    length=len(card)
    summ=0

    while(card!="#####"):
        if (card[0]=='4' or card[0]=='5' or card[0]=='6' or (card[0]=='3' and      card[1]=='1')):
            dbls=sumofdoubles()
            evens=sumofevens()
            odds=sumofodds()
            if((dbls+evens+odds)%10==0):
                print("Valid")

main()

This is the full traceback for those wondering

    python test.py<s.input
    File "test.py", line 52 in <module>
      main()
    File "test.py", line 48, in main
      odds=sumofodds()
    File "test.py", line 33, in sumofodds
      j=int(card[i])
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '#'
share|improve this question
4  
What's the full traceback? What do you type into the console? –  Blender Apr 13 '13 at 21:42
2  
Well, on one of the j=int(card[i]) calls the input (i.e., the ith character of the card) is not a valid integer number. My guess is it is a dash or space, either of which would give that error. Without more details, it is hard to tell exactly. –  Blair Apr 13 '13 at 21:46
    
looks like you typed a # which isn't a number... –  Fredrik Pihl Apr 13 '13 at 21:49
    
I need to use the "#####" for my sentinel value though –  James Apr 13 '13 at 21:50
    
In that case you'll need to add a test (i.e., if statement) for your sentinel value before the int() call and take the appropriate action if it is found. –  Blair Apr 13 '13 at 21:57
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2 Answers

You're calling input each time you go into sumofodds, sumofevens, or sumofdoubles, so each of them will be working on a separate credit card number. You probably only want to be calling input in main and should be passing card as an argument to each of those other functions.

Your functions then might look something like this:

def sum_of_odds(card):
    x = len(card)
    # ...

# ...

def main():
    while True:
        card = input()
        if card == '#####':
            break
        odds = sum_of_odds(card)
        # ...
share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to put the input outside of all the functions, because i've tried and i've gotten errors like: unbound local error: card is referenced before assignment –  James Apr 13 '13 at 21:55
    
@James: Sure you can with a global, but those are somewhat bad practice; I've edited my answer to show some code that would use arguments. –  icktoofay Apr 13 '13 at 21:59
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Well, whatever you did you typed in something that isn't actually a Base 10 number. This includes anything that isn't number characters or spaces. So don't type in that. :-)

Examples:

>>> int('04.9')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '04.9'

>>> int('4-')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '4-'

>>> int("Jack")
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'Jack'

Update: Yes you typed a '#'. That's not a valid number.

share|improve this answer
    
So I would assume my while loop is not working? –  James Apr 13 '13 at 21:57
    
@James It's not working as you think it is. Python is an imperative language. It will only check the card value when the test is reached. It will not check the card value at any other time. –  Lennart Regebro Apr 13 '13 at 22:02
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