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Is any way to get local variables from first class to second class?

class Position:
    positionX = 0.0   #starting value of positionX, but I need to change this in counting method when I push arrow key

    def counting(self, posX):
        self.positionX = posX   #posX is for example position X of my cursor which I move with arrows so value is changing when I push to arrow key.

class Draw:
    posInst = Position()
    print posInst.positionX   #here I need to get positionX variable from Position class. But its show me just 0.0. I need to get exact value which is change when I push arrow key and its change in counting method. If I push arrow key and value in counting method will be 20 I need this number in Draw class. But everytime is there 0.0.

Is any way to make this? Thanks for advices.

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3 Answers 3

The reason that in your code shown the line

print posInst.positionX

prints 0.0 is because Draw creates its own instance of Position which you have not called its counting method to change it.

class Position:
    positionX = 0.0

    def counting(self, posX):
        self.positionX = posX


class Draw:
    posInst = Position()
    posInst.counting(20)
    print posInst.positionX

draw = Draw()

In your actual code is the Draw class actually making its own instance of Position class.

if it is then when you want to call counting you do draw_instance.posInst.counting(value).

If you are creating a separate instance of position that you want to call its counting method directly then you would be better off passing in to draw the instance of position.

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The 'proper' way to do this is to include a get method in your Position class that returns the positionX. It's considered bad practice to access other classes internal variables directly.

class Position:
    positionX = 0.0

    def counting(self, posX):
        self.positionX = posX

    def getPosition(self):
        return self.positionX

class Draw:
    posInst = Position()
    print posInst.getPosition()
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Noes. Python hates verbosity, there's no way a getter could be a "proper" way of anything within Python. –  bobrobbob Apr 14 '13 at 9:05
    
I think you'll find, although more verbose, all internal variables should be protected from outside manipulation. This is for any object in any OOP language, any changes should be made through function calls and not directly –  TheMerovingian Apr 14 '13 at 10:06
    
I found solution. When I use in Position class constructor init its working. But its working just only in mainLoop. –  Tomas Apr 14 '13 at 10:14
    
If you read my edit, I did go into the init, but yeah, it will only work within the scope of your object. If you create the object within a loop, it won't exist outside of the loop, and if you create another one it will be a completely different object. Try create the object outside of the loop and it should retain it's internal variables once you leave the loop. –  TheMerovingian Apr 14 '13 at 10:18
    
@TheMerovingian: you're wrong on the Python philosophy. Private/protected keywords don't exist by design. –  bobrobbob Apr 15 '13 at 4:17

So its working this way.

class Position:
    def __init__(self):
        self.positionX = 0.0

    def counting(self, posX):
        self.positionX = posX

def mainLoop:
    position = Position()

    while running:
        position.positionX

I try this in another class but its just works in loop. But its working. Thanks all for advices :)

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