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I want to present a view that responds to orientation changes but for various reasons can't use iOS's built-in autorotation. In viewDidLoad I use the current orientation to determine the initial layout of the view:

_originalOrientation = [UIDevice currentDevice].orientation;

// if we were launched flat or unknown, use the status bar orientation as a guide
if (_originalOrientation == UIDeviceOrientationUnknown ||
    _originalOrientation == UIDeviceOrientationFaceDown ||
    _originalOrientation == UIDeviceOrientationFaceUp) {

        _originalOrientation = UIDeviceOrientationFromInterfaceOrientation([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation);
}

As you can see from my comment, I need to handle the case where [UIDevice currentDevice].orientation is not a usable direction (i.e. the device is flat or in an unknown orientation). In this scenario, I attempt to use the statusBarOrientation to infer the device's orientation (using UIViewController's interfaceOrientation would be an alternative way to get the same information):

UIDeviceOrientation UIDeviceOrientationFromInterfaceOrientation(UIInterfaceOrientation interface) {
    // note: because UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft and UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight have the same value, this conversion can't distinguish them

    if (interface == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft) {
        return UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft;

    } else if (interface == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
        return UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight;

    } else if (interface == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
        return UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown;

    } else {
        return UIDeviceOrientationPortrait;
    }
}

However my logic can't accurately discern the two landscape cases because they are defined UIApplication.h to be the same constant value:

// Note that UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft is equal to UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight (and vice versa).
// This is because rotating the device to the left requires rotating the content to the right.
typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, UIInterfaceOrientation) {
    UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait           = UIDeviceOrientationPortrait,
    UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown = UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown,
    UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft      = UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight,
    UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight     = UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft
};

Is there an alternative way I can distinguish between UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft and UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight? Is there a better way for me to perform my "fallback" logic besides using the status bar orientation?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

You wrote:

However my logic can't accurately discern the two landscape cases because they are defined UIApplication.h to be the same constant value

I am pretty sure that they are not! The values for interface and device orientations are swapped. See UIApplication.h:

typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, UIInterfaceOrientation) {
    UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait           = UIDeviceOrientationPortrait,
    UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown = UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown,
    UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft      = UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight,
    UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight     = UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft
};

The interface orientation UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft is equal to the device orientation UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight, and vice versa. But:

  • UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft != UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight
  • UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft != UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight

Try this code, I assume that will fix the problem:

UIDeviceOrientation UIDeviceOrientationFromInterfaceOrientation(UIInterfaceOrientation interface) {
    // interface orientation left is device orientation right
    if (interface == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft) {
        return UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight;

    // interface orientation right is device orientation left
    } else if (interface == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
        return UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft;

    } else if (interface == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
        return UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown;

    } else {
        return UIDeviceOrientationPortrait;
    }
}

BTW, you should also consider to use an own prefix for your function instead of UI, otherwise it may be easy to mistakenly assume that UIDeviceOrientationFromInterfaceOrientation is an API function.

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The prefix was simply to indicate that it returns a UIDeviceOrientation, but you're absolutely right this could potentially collide with Apple code in a future release. –  jszumski Apr 23 '13 at 1:48
    
It confused me: I tried to find UIDeviceOrientationFromInterfaceOrientation in the Apple docs before I realized that it is your own implementation :) –  Tammo Freese Apr 23 '13 at 13:49

The orientation property of UIDevice is an enum that does distinguish between landscape left and right (their values are 3 and 4 respectively), so you can check that value.

typedef enum {
   UIDeviceOrientationUnknown,
   UIDeviceOrientationPortrait,
   UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown,
   UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft,
   UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight,
   UIDeviceOrientationFaceUp,
   UIDeviceOrientationFaceDown
} UIDeviceOrientation;
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In this case, I only get into my fallback logic if I've determined that the device orientation is either UIDeviceOrientationUnknown, UIDeviceOrientationFaceUp, or UIDeviceOrientationFaceDown. –  jszumski Apr 14 '13 at 5:44
    
@jszumski, does it matter if the orientation is wrong if you can't determine whether it's portrait or one of the landscapes? Apple's own apps get it wrong sometimes if the device is lying flat. There's no way to tell what is the correct orientation in those cases. –  rdelmar Apr 14 '13 at 5:52
    
In this case I'm using the orientation to determine how to show video from the camera, so it's immediately obvious if the preview is upside down (i.e. it should have been rotated for UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight but instead was UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft). –  jszumski Apr 14 '13 at 5:54

If you're showing what the camera is seeing, i would ignore all orientations and show the user a preview of what the devices sees in portrait. What they see will always be "correct", and never accidentally upside down.

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This would work except the camera output (AVCaptureSesssion) needs to set the AVCaptureVideoOrientation videoOrientation property so that grabbing frames from the output yields images that are oriented properly. If you don't know landscape left from landscape right, you can potentially create upside down images. –  jszumski Apr 18 '13 at 23:04

You always can determine device orientation using gravity property of CMDeviceMotion class. Property return a normalized vector pointed to Earth center (aka real gravity vector). If you not interested in angles, you can test only signs and generate constants for your purpose.

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How would this help if I've already determined that the device is face down? –  jszumski Apr 19 '13 at 12:11
    
By positive or negative value of (x,y,z) components you can distinguish between UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft and UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight. –  Rubanov Pavel Apr 19 '13 at 13:43

This is how I have done it in the pass

Create a global variable called previousOr. Then in your first viewController use the following code to determine the status bar position. I put it in the viewDidAppear

if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft) {
    previousOr = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"L"];
}
else if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
    previousOr = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"L"];
}
else if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait) {
    previousOr = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"P"];
}
else if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
    previousOr = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"P"];
}

Then in your subsequent viewControllers you have the following in the ViewDidLoad methods, this will detect if the device is portrait or landscape or if the device is flat what the device was in before they placed it flat:

if (UIDeviceOrientationIsLandscape([UIDevice currentDevice].orientation)) {
    NSLog(@"landscape");
    [self switchToLandscape];
}
else if (UIDeviceOrientationIsPortrait([UIDevice currentDevice].orientation)) {
    NSLog(@"portrait");
    [self switchToPortrait];
}
else {
    if ([previousOr isEqualToString:@"L"]) {
        [self switchToLandscape];
    }
    else  {
        [self switchToPortrait];
    }
}

Then you also have the following to do the re-plotting of elements on the view

- (void)switchToLandscape {
    previousOr = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"L"];
    //do stuff like replot centers
}

- (void)switchToPortrait {
    previousOr = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"P"];
    //do stuff like replot centers
}

and then you also have the following to detect the change in orientation:

- (void) didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)fromInterfaceOrientation {
if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft) {
    [self switchToLandscape];
}
else if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
    [self switchToLandscape];
}
else if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait) {
    [self switchToPortrait];
}
else if ([UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
    [self switchToPortrait];
}
}

-(BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation
{
    return YES;
}

-(BOOL) shouldAutorotate {
    return YES;
}

NOTE; I put in both shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation and shouldAutoRotate for backward compatibility.

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