Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a program in Java where I have to read the information that an Arduino is sending. I took the Java code from here. Now, I didn't really understand how it works, but I tried to modify it and I got this:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import gnu.io.CommPortIdentifier;
import gnu.io.SerialPort;
import gnu.io.SerialPortEvent;
import gnu.io.SerialPortEventListener;
import java.util.Enumeration;

public class Serial implements SerialPortEventListener {
    SerialPort serialPort;

    private static final String PORT_NAMES[] = {
            "/dev/tty.usbserial-A9007UX1", // Mac OS X
            "/dev/ttyUSB0", // Linux
            "COM3", // Windows
    };

    private BufferedReader input;
    private static OutputStream output;
    private static final int TIME_OUT = 2000;
    private static final int DATA_RATE = 115200;

    public void initialize() {
        CommPortIdentifier portId = null;
        Enumeration portEnum = CommPortIdentifier.getPortIdentifiers();

        while (portEnum.hasMoreElements()) {
            CommPortIdentifier currPortId = (CommPortIdentifier) portEnum.nextElement();
            for (String portName : PORT_NAMES) {
                if (currPortId.getName().equals(portName)) {
                    portId = currPortId;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        if (portId == null) {
            System.out.println("Could not find COM port.");
            return;
        }

        try {
            serialPort = (SerialPort) portId.open(this.getClass().getName(),TIME_OUT);

            serialPort.setSerialPortParams(DATA_RATE, SerialPort.DATABITS_8, SerialPort.STOPBITS_1,    SerialPort.PARITY_NONE);

            input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(serialPort.getInputStream()));
            output = serialPort.getOutputStream();

            serialPort.addEventListener(this);
            serialPort.notifyOnDataAvailable(true);
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e.toString());
        }
    }

    public synchronized void serialEvent(SerialPortEvent oEvent) {
        if (oEvent.getEventType() == SerialPortEvent.DATA_AVAILABLE) {
            try {
                String inputLine=input.readLine();
                System.out.println(inputLine);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.err.println(e.toString());
            }
        }
    }

    public synchronized void close() {
        if (serialPort != null) {
            serialPort.removeEventListener();
            serialPort.close();
        }
    }

    public Serial(String ncom){
        if(Integer.parseInt(ncom)>=3 && Integer.parseInt(ncom)<=9)
            PORT_NAMES[2] = "COM" + ncom;
        initialize();
        Thread t=new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                try {Thread.sleep(1000000);} catch (InterruptedException ie) {}
            }
        };
        t.start();
        System.out.println("Serial Comms Started");
    }

    public synchronized void send(int b){
        try{
            output.write(b);
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e.toString());
        }
    }

    public synchronized int read(){
        int b = 0;

        try{
            b = (int)input.read();
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e.toString());
        }
        return b;
    }
}

I create the object Serial with the COM port I need in the main program, then I use Serial.read and Serial.write when I need it.

Serial.write works great, Arduino gets the data and show it in a LCD Display. The problem is Serial.read. When the program is running, it keep read from serial port (around every 40 ms), but that doesn't mean Arduino sent something. Arduino sends a byte only when a button is pushed. So, when the Java code is running, it throws "n" Exception before read something, and this couses so much lag.

I know I need something like Serial.available(), I tried input.available(), but it doesn't work. I don't know how to solve this problem.

If you have a code that working, I'd be so much grateful if you could give it to me. I just need two methods, read and write, I don't care how the code works :D

EDIT:

I changed the Serial class, now it has again this method as apremalal said

public synchronized void serialEvent(SerialPortEvent oEvent) {

        if (oEvent.getEventType() == SerialPortEvent.DATA_AVAILABLE) {
            try {

                String inputLine=null;
                if (input.ready()) {
                    inputLine = input.readLine();
                    panel.read(inputLine);
                }

            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.err.println(e.toString());
            }
        }       
    }

and in the other class (Panel in this case) I've got this:

public void read(String data){

    System.out.println(data);
    System.out.println(data == "255");
    if(data == "255")
        //code here 
}

It print the values correctly but data == "255" is always false, even if I really get a 255 ....I tried to do Integer.parseInt but nothing changed. Why the hell?

EDIT 2: Ok solved :\

public void read(String data){

serialRead = Integer.parseInt(data);

if(serialRead == 255)
    //code here 

}

Now it's work..don't know why I had to do this...meh whatever :)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't want to specifically write a read function it's already there in the sample code.As TheMerovingian pointed out you can check the input Buffer before reading.Here is the working code which I have used in one of my projects.

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import gnu.io.CommPortIdentifier; 
import gnu.io.SerialPort;
import gnu.io.SerialPortEvent; 
import gnu.io.SerialPortEventListener; 
import java.util.Enumeration;


public class SerialTest implements SerialPortEventListener {
SerialPort serialPort;
    /** The port we're normally going to use. */
private static final String PORT_NAMES[] = {                  "/dev/tty.usbserial-A9007UX1", // Mac OS X
        "/dev/ttyUSB0", // Linux
        "COM35", // Windows
};
private BufferedReader input;
private OutputStream output;
private static final int TIME_OUT = 2000;
private static final int DATA_RATE = 9600;

public void initialize() {
    CommPortIdentifier portId = null;
    Enumeration portEnum = CommPortIdentifier.getPortIdentifiers();

    //First, Find an instance of serial port as set in PORT_NAMES.
    while (portEnum.hasMoreElements()) {
        CommPortIdentifier currPortId = (CommPortIdentifier) portEnum.nextElement();
        for (String portName : PORT_NAMES) {
            if (currPortId.getName().equals(portName)) {
                portId = currPortId;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    if (portId == null) {
        System.out.println("Could not find COM port.");
        return;
    }

    try {
        serialPort = (SerialPort) portId.open(this.getClass().getName(),
                TIME_OUT);
        serialPort.setSerialPortParams(DATA_RATE,
                SerialPort.DATABITS_8,
                SerialPort.STOPBITS_1,
                SerialPort.PARITY_NONE);

        // open the streams
        input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(serialPort.getInputStream()));
        output = serialPort.getOutputStream();

        serialPort.addEventListener(this);
        serialPort.notifyOnDataAvailable(true);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.err.println(e.toString());
    }
}


public synchronized void close() {
    if (serialPort != null) {
        serialPort.removeEventListener();
        serialPort.close();
    }
}

public synchronized void serialEvent(SerialPortEvent oEvent) {
    if (oEvent.getEventType() == SerialPortEvent.DATA_AVAILABLE) {
        try {
            String inputLine=null;
            if (input.ready()) {
                inputLine = input.readLine();
                            System.out.println(inputLine);
            }

        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println(e.toString());
        }
    }
    // Ignore all the other eventTypes, but you should consider the other ones.
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    SerialTest main = new SerialTest();
    main.initialize();
    Thread t=new Thread() {
        public void run() {
            //the following line will keep this app alive for 1000    seconds,
            //waiting for events to occur and responding to them    (printing incoming messages to console).
            try {Thread.sleep(1000000);} catch (InterruptedException    ie) {}
        }
    };
    t.start();
    System.out.println("Started");
}
}

EDIT : serialEvent function is responsible for reading the buffer.

public synchronized void serialEvent(SerialPortEvent oEvent) {
 if (oEvent.getEventType() == SerialPortEvent.DATA_AVAILABLE) {
    try {
        String inputLine=null;
        if (input.ready()) {
            inputLine = input.readLine();
            System.out.println(inputLine);
        }

    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.err.println(e.toString());
    }
 }
// Ignore all the other eventTypes, but you should consider the other ones.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes..this is the sample java code from arduino playground... –  Giammarco Boscaro Apr 14 '13 at 8:21
    
I have edited the serialEvent method to avoid the issue you've mentioned –  apremalal Apr 14 '13 at 8:29
    
yep but this code print the data on the console. What I need is, from another class (like my Main.java), get the data and use it. Like "if(Serial.read()=255){ dosomething()}" –  Giammarco Boscaro Apr 14 '13 at 8:34
    
Try implementing your needed functionality inside serialEvent method instead of using a different class. –  apremalal Apr 14 '13 at 14:13
    
that's what I was thinking. I'll try to send the data from the SerialTest tread to my other thread. –  Giammarco Boscaro Apr 16 '13 at 18:33

The BufferedReader class has a ready() method that returns True if "the buffer is not empty, or if the underlying character stream is ready." and False otherwise. So you could add a check in the read() method to make sure there is data to be read before trying to read.

public synchronized int read(){

    int b = 0;  

    try{
        if (input.ready()) {
            b = (int)input.read();
        }
    }catch (Exception e) {
        System.err.println(e.toString());
    }
    return b;
}

It looks like the code has a try-catch in place to handle if those things fail, which is possibly what causes your lag because try-catch are quite expensive. So the input.ready() check should result in fewer exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
I added the input.ready() and now I get java.io.IOException: Underlying input stream returned zero bytes when I press the button. From the Arduino serial monitor I see the data that I'm sending, so I know it works, but then in Java while I press the button the program just stuck, then when I release it, it throws the exception and then keep running normally –  Giammarco Boscaro Apr 14 '13 at 8:20
    
What exactly does the exception say? –  TheMerovingian Apr 14 '13 at 10:03
    
java.io.IOException: Underlying input stream returned zero bytes –  Giammarco Boscaro Apr 14 '13 at 11:06
    
Oh right, I though that was the start of your next sentence. From the BufferedReader and InputStreamReader documentation, it seems that the ready() method should only return True if there is data in the buffer, so I honestly don't know why it isn't working. You might be best off using the SerialEvent code and storing all the data into your own array, which you can use to read the last X received bytes. That way you receive data as the arduino sends it, but you don't have to try retrieve it manually. –  TheMerovingian Apr 14 '13 at 11:17
    
uhm, ok, I'll try that way asap –  Giammarco Boscaro Apr 14 '13 at 11:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.