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I have below code:

#include<iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
template<class T>
class Stack
{
private:
    vector<T> stack;

public:
    T Pop()
    {
        if (stack.size()!=0)
        {
            T temp;
            temp=stack[stack.size()-1];
            stack.erase(stack.begin()+stack.size()-1);
            return temp;
        }
        else
                   //return nothing
                   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                   //How i can do above by code    
    }

In pop function: I want if stack.size==0; Pop function return nothing

How I can do it?

share|improve this question
6  
I would throw an error if someone tried to pop an empty list. –  squiguy Apr 14 '13 at 6:39
3  
Return a boost::optional, throw an exception, return an invalid value (hard with a generic type). Take your pick. –  chris Apr 14 '13 at 6:39
3  
Or do like std::stack and have different functions for getting the top of the stack and popping the stack. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 14 '13 at 6:41
    
Another option would be to return std::pair<bool, T> instead of T, where the boolean is true on a successful pop and negative otherwise. But I think throwing an exception would be better, since it's an error in the program to pop an empty stack. –  Ynau Apr 14 '13 at 6:42
1  
Then wherever you are going to call the Pop function, you should first call a function to check if the stack is empty. If it is not empty, then you can call Pop. –  maditya Apr 14 '13 at 6:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is basically a question of how to handle non-total functions—functions that are not necessarily defined for all possible inputs. There are many ways to go about it, though none of them is type-safe:

  1. Have two separate functions for retrieve erasing the top element of the stack, much like std::stack::top() and std::stack::pop().

  2. Use a reference parameter and return a bool indicating whether an element was returned:

    bool pop(T& value) {
      if (stack.empty())
        return false;
      value = stack.back();
      stack.pop_back();
      return true;
    }
    

    The caller can write:

    T value;
    if (stack.pop(value)) {
      use(value);
    }
    
  3. Return a boost::optional<T>.

  4. Return a default-constructed T instance. This requires that T be default-constructible, which is already imposed by some std::vector member functions.

  5. Throw an exception, documenting that a precondition was violated.

  6. Leave the behaviour of popping an empty stack undefined.

I recommend #1, #2, or #3, depending on preference and what fits best with the surrounding code.

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You probably still want to do the same way as std::stack that to split into std::stack::top and std::stack::pop. You don't want to pop to return a value.

Here is the explaination from http://cpptruths.blogspot.com.au/2005/10/why-does-stdstackpop-returns-void.html

http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/stack.html explains

[3] One might wonder why pop() returns void, instead of value_type. That is, why must one use top() and pop() to examine and remove the top element, instead of combining the two in a single member function? In fact, there is a good reason for this design. If pop() returned the top element, it would have to return by value rather than by reference: return by reference would create a dangling pointer. Return by value, however, is inefficient: it involves at least one redundant copy constructor call. Since it is impossible for pop() to return a value in such a way as to be both efficient and correct, it is more sensible for it to return no value at all and to require clients to use top() to inspect the value at the top of the stack.

std::stack < T > is a template. If pop() returned the top element, it would have to return by value rather than by reference as per the of above explanation. That means, at the caller side it must be copied in an another T type of object. That involves a copy constructor or copy assignment operator call. What if this type T is sophisticated enough and it throws an exception during copy construction or copy assignment? In that case, the rvalue, i.e. the stack top (returned by value) is simply lost and there is no other way to retrieve it from the stack as the stack's pop operation is successfully completed!

The practice way is to use pop(), top(), empty() together:

T top()
{
   return stack[size()-1];
}

void pop()
{
   stack.erase(stack.begin()+stack.size()-1);
}

usage:

if (!stack.empty())
{
    T t = top();
    pop();
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, sorry, I went away. I've updated my answer. –  billz Apr 14 '13 at 7:37

There are a couple of alternatives. One is to return an instance of T constructed with the standard constructor:

return T();

Another way would be to return a special sentinel wrapper object, that can be implicitly converted to T, and have a comparison operator so the user can check it.

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@ Joachim Pileborg by your answer if T=int Pop (in case 0 size)return 0 and this return may make mistake in come case –  MM-BB Apr 14 '13 at 7:05
    
@MM-BB Then you have to go the way of using a wrapper objects, that the user can compare to a static object in the class. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 14 '13 at 7:23
    
@MM-BB Or force the user of the class to check if the stack is empty first. Even the standard-library std::stack does no checking, and will crash if you pop to much, or even calling top on an empty stack. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 14 '13 at 7:29

Here's one way of doing this. The idea is to package a Boolean flag together with the result in a tuple. The flag indicates whether there is a result or not. Notice though that the current implementation requires T to be default constructible.

template<class T>
class Stack
{
private:
    std::vector<T> stack;

public:
    typedef std::tuple<bool, T> return_t;

    void Push(const T& t)
    {
        stack.push_back(t);
    }

    return_t Pop()
    {
        if (stack.size()!=0)
        {
            T temp;
            temp=stack[stack.size()-1];
            stack.erase(stack.begin()+stack.size()-1);
            return std::make_tuple(true, temp);
        }
        else
            return std::make_tuple(false, T());
    }
};
int main()
{
    Stack<int> my_stack;
    bool has_result;
    int result;

    my_stack.Push(5);
    std::tie(has_result, result) = my_stack.Pop();
    std::cout << "has result = " << has_result << "\n";
    std::cout << "result = " << result << "\n";

    std::tie(has_result, result) = my_stack.Pop();
    std::cout << "has_result = " << has_result << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

You can also do something like declare the pop method as void or even better, bool to get the status of the operation and pass the T type as an argument by reference in order to store the result in it:

bool Pop (T& item)
{
    if (stack.size() != 0)
       {
           // your code
           item = temp; // you can even use item instead of temp from the begining

           return true;
       }
    return false;
}
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