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I need to write a method that will recursively factor the numbers upto 1234567890, my current application works on only small numbers before throwing a StackOverflowError. I understand that my problem is too many recursive calls, but I can't figure out how to reduce the number of my calls.

It needs to be recursive.

I'm thinking the solution is related to the math behind my algorithm. I've looked at different iterative solutions and I just can't seem to wrap my head around executing it recursively with less calls. The code:

public static boolean isPrime(int input, int i) {
    if (i <= 2) {
        return true;
    }
    if (input % i != 0) {
        return isPrime(input, i-1);
    } else {
        factors(input, i);
        return false;
    }
}
public static void factors(int input, int i) {
    if (i <= 1) {
        System.out.printf(" %d", 1);
    } else {
        if (input % i == 0) {
            System.out.printf(" %d", i);
        }
        factors(input, i - 1);
    }
}

and is started by:

System.out.println("What integer would you like to factor?");
    num1 = scan.nextInt();
    if(isPrime(num1, num1 - 1)){
        System.out.println("Input is a prime number");
    } else {
        System.out.println(" factors\nInput isn't a prime number.");
    }
share|improve this question
    
How do you start this method? Can you provide some examples? Do you have to use recursion as this can be done without recursion at all. I suggest you show use the actual code as this still won't compile. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '13 at 9:27
    
I added the section where it is used, and it should work as well. It has to be recursive. –  user2272115 Apr 14 '13 at 9:42
    
Try instead isPrime(num1, (int) Math.sqrt(num1)) It will have a depth of N^0.5 instead of N. You could print out both i and n / i as factors if you need both. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '13 at 10:18
    
It needs to work with large numbers(10 digits), but it throws stackoverflow after ~6000 iterations. –  user2272115 Apr 14 '13 at 10:33
    
The simple solution is to use iteration which will have a stack depth of 1 or 2. It's not clear to me what the point of using recursion if you have to also use iteration to avoid some recursive depth. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '13 at 10:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I presume the reason it needs to be recursive is because it's a homework question. Therefore I won't tell you how to do it but rather what's wrong with your math. Your algorithm looks partly correct except that (a) you're forgetting to divide 'n' by each factor that you find, and (b) you're looking for factors from large numbers down instead of small numbers up. It would be better to start and 2 and count up to sqrt(n) although that won't solve the stack overflow.

You need to look for factors in a loop and reserve the use of recursion (if you really need to use it at all) for factorising the remaining number after dividing out the prime factor. Because you don't want to get passed a 6-digit prime and then need 1 million levels of the stack to prove that it has no factor. i.e. this needs to be in a simple loop instead of recursion:

return isPrime(input, i-1);

...and this can be recursive:

factors(input, i);

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Change Your Factor method to be non-recursive (if it is not required to be recursive)

 public static void factors(int input, int i) {
     for(int j = i; j >= 1; j--) {
         if (input % j == 0)
             System.out.println(j);
     } 
}

Edited: Something like below is a recursive approach for solving this problem.

public void isPrime(int num1)
{
int count=countFactors(num1);
if(count==0)
System.out.println("No is prime");
}

public int countFactors(int num,int i)
{

if(i>num/2)return 0;
if(num%i==0)
{
System.out.println(i);
return 1+countFactors(num,i+1);
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
It has to be recursive. –  user2272115 Apr 14 '13 at 9:39
    
In that case your current logic is completely wrong.. –  Algorithmist Apr 14 '13 at 9:53
    
How is my logic wrong? It works for smaller numbers. In terms of finding the factors or in terms of executing the recursion? –  user2272115 Apr 14 '13 at 10:00
    
@Algorithmist: a simple method like you've described is not feasible on 10 digit numbers. Plus is lists factors, which is not the same as factorising. –  Tim Cooper Apr 14 '13 at 10:01
    
Added new logic for recursive approach. –  Algorithmist Apr 14 '13 at 10:06

Increase the stack size in your java. you can search how to increase the stack size

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You can use tail call optimisation (which Java doesn't do for you) with

public static void factors(int input, int i) {
    while(i > 1) {
        if (input % i == 0) {
            System.out.printf(" %d", i);
        }
        i = i - 1;
    }
    System.out.printf(" %d", 1);
}

except of course you are no longer doing recursion.

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The algorithm you seem to be using for primality check, is the trial division algorithm.

There is a number of other methods, but, keeping to this strategy, there is a proposition stating that you only need to check up to the square root of n, where n is your input. Also, your predicate does not deal with negative integers appropriately (returns true).

So, in this first approach, your algorithm would be:

public static boolean isPrime(int n) {
    if (n < 2) { return false; }
    return helper_isPrime(n, 2, (int) Math.sqrt(n));
}

Where:

private static boolean helper_isPrime(int n, int i, int max) {
    if (i > max) { return true; }
    if (n % i == 0) { return false; }
    return helper_isPrime(n, i+1, max);
}

Separating in two methods isolates the test for n < 2. Note that n will remain unchanged, and so the test only needs to be performed once, in the beginning of the process.

Furthermore, factoring is left behind. In my opinion, it should be asked from the outside, like so:

System.out.println("What integer would you like to factor?");
num1 = scan.nextInt();
if(isPrime(num1)){
    System.out.println("Input is a prime number");
} else {
    System.out.println("Input isn't a prime number.");
    int[] fac = factor(n);
    System.out.println("Factors: " + fac.toString());
}

Where factor would be your favourite factor algorithm. A factoring algorithm would probably find it's worst case of execution with prime numbers, but, as the test was made already, and since the algorithm is called only when the number isn't prime, this scenario won't happen.

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