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#!/usr/bin/env perl

use Term::ReadKey;
ReadMode 4;
END {
    ReadMode 0; # Reset tty mode before exiting
}

while (<>) {
    $key = ReadKey(0);
    $key == "\x04" and last; # Ctrl+D breaks the loop 
    print $key;
}

When I had it without the while loop, it was printing back what I typed in.

It doesn't even produce any output at the end (if it was buffering it or something). Like I'd run it and type a few letters and hit Ctrl+D. It prints nothing.

I'm trying to make a program to convert mouse scroll escape codes into keypresses. I hope I'm not barking up the wrong tree.

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5  
String equality is tested with the eq operator. The == converts the arguments to numbers first, which will usually be zero. You would have been warned had you put use strict; use warnings at the top of your script. –  amon Apr 14 '13 at 9:39
    
That may be true and my perl-fu is weak indeed, but i'm nearly certain that is not the true issue. echo "abc" | this_program still prints nothing. However if I take the loop out and have it read and print 2 char's, echo "abc" | this_program will in fact print ab –  Steven Lu Apr 14 '13 at 9:49
1  
Oh, now I see it: You read a whole line of input (incl. obligatory \n) with the <> operator. Then, you read a single keypress with ReadKey(0) which you may echo. The line (in $_) is discarded. Change your loop condition to while(defined(my $key = ReadKey(0))){...} and really use strict; use warnings;. –  amon Apr 14 '13 at 9:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This line

while (<>) 

reads a line from STDIN (assuming you ran the program with no command line arguments). Once a line has been read, it enters the body of the while loop. Whatever you typed up to and including the newline is now in $_.

Now, you press a key, it's stored in $key and numerically compared to CTRL-D. Since neither is numeric, they both end up being zero, the loop terminates.

This is why you should turn on warnings which would have told you:

Argument "^D" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./tt.pl line 15,  line 1.
Argument "c" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./tt.pl line 15,  line 1.

Of course, it would make sense to put the loop-termination condition where it belongs as well:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Term::ReadKey;
ReadMode 4;
END {
    ReadMode 0; # Reset tty mode before exiting
}

my $input;
{
    local $| = 1;
    while ((my $key = ReadKey(0)) ne "\x04") {
        print $key;
        $input .= $key;
    }
}

print "'$input'\n";
share|improve this answer
    
As it is, this code upon exiting will print out all input a second time, yes? –  Steven Lu Apr 14 '13 at 22:14
    
Of course ... to show what was put into $input ... I am assuming you want to do something with the keys the user presses, right? –  Sinan Ünür Apr 14 '13 at 22:30
    
yes. I'm remapping keys and stuff. I'm now trying to figure out how to deal with EOF. echo "abc" | myprogram | hexdump -C shows lots of \x00 going in (and it does not exit). What is the real convention for breaking out of the loop? clearly unix programs do not send a \x04 byte to signal it, i am only receiving the byte corresponding to Ctrl+D. –  Steven Lu Apr 14 '13 at 23:00
    
I guess I should just break out on a null byte as well. –  Steven Lu Apr 14 '13 at 23:06

Just replace the while condition to:

while(1) {
   # ...
}
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2  
I think this also needs to set the autoflush $|=1; for the key echo to happen immediately –  Neil Slater Apr 14 '13 at 10:05

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