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Please check the code below:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use Cwd;        
use warnings;    
use Net::FTP;    
use File::Copy;    
use File::Path;    
use Time::Local;     
use File::Basename;    
use strict;    
my $directory = "/media/Songs/Perl/test";    
my $path = "/media/Songs/Perl/test_sort";    
opendir(DIR,$directory);    
my @files = readdir(DIR);    
closedir(DIR);    
foreach my $t (@files)
{    
    copy($t,$path); //copying files
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by M42, Jeroen, rene, Moritz Bunkus, bensiu Apr 14 '13 at 14:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
"Please check the code" is not a question, its a request. If you want to avoid downvotes, pinpoint the problem in your code, include error messages, explain how the program is not working the way you want. –  TLP Apr 14 '13 at 11:17

2 Answers 2

This is my revision of your code.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Copy;

my $source_dir = "/media/Songs/Perl/test";
my $target_dir = "/media/Songs/Perl/test_sort";

opendir(my $DIR, $source_dir) || die "can't opendir $source_dir: $!";  
my @files = readdir($DIR);

foreach my $t (@files)
{
   if(-f "$source_dir/$t" ) {
      #Check with -f only for files (no directories)
      copy "$source_dir/$t", "$target_dir/$t";
   }
}

closedir($DIR);
share|improve this answer
    
thnx Miguel Prz ....its working now.. –  InvI Apr 14 '13 at 10:29
1  
What good is it to provide an answer without explanations? –  TLP Apr 14 '13 at 11:05
    
It is self-explanatory, isn't it? –  Miguel Prz Apr 14 '13 at 11:11
1  
No, it isn't. There are many subtleties, explanations and recommendations that can be added. The point of StackOverflow is to teach people things, not to solve their problems for them. –  TLP Apr 14 '13 at 11:16
    
Feel free to edit my answer –  Miguel Prz Apr 14 '13 at 11:17

The readdir function takes a bit of post-processing to be useful. It returns all entries in that directory, including . (this directory) and .. parent directory. The strings returned are not full paths from your $PWD.

  1. Filter out unwanted items: Regex to match parent and self links

    my @files = grep !/\A\.\.?\z/, readdir DIR;
    

    or only select simple -files (no directories nor fun like pipes, sockets…)

    my @files = grep -f "$directory/$_", readdir DIR;
    
  2. Make absolute paths:

    Really, one should use Path::Class or File::Spec. But if you are careful, and don't care about portability, then

    for my $file (@files) {
      my $source = "$directory/$file";
      ...;
    }
    

    may be good enough.

The copy function takes two filenames, not a file and a target directory. And you should perform error checking:

for my $file (@files) {
  my $source = "$directory/$file";
  my $target = "$path/$file";
  copy $source => $target or warn "Copy of $file failed: $!";
}
share|improve this answer
    
No. The copy subroutine from File::Copy does not require two filenames. It will use the original file name if the second argument is a directory. +1 for the explanation though. –  TLP Apr 14 '13 at 11:04

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