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I have a bunch of buttons to listen to. Each button increments or decrements a value in an EditText. Since every Button changes a different EditText I'm left with just switching. There are quite a lot of buttons. Some buttons do the same thing except they are hidden according to user preference. For every button in XML I did android:onClick="plusEditTexts", or android:onClick="minEditTexts" of course.

public void plusEditTexts(View v) {
    switch(v.getId()) {
        case R.id.firstButton1Inc:
        case R.id.secondButton1Inc:
        // EditText1++
        break;
        case R.id.firstButton2Dec:
        case R.id.secondButton2Dec:
        // EditText2++
        break;
        ...
    }
}

public void minEditTexts(View v) {
    switch(v.getId()) {
        case R.id.firstButton1Inc:
        case R.id.secondButton1Inc:
        // EditText1--
        break;
        case R.id.firstButton2Dec:
        case R.id.secondButton2Dec:
        // EditText2--
        break;
        ...
    }
}

I was wondering if this is the best way? There are quite a lot of buttons. So the switch statement gets huge.

Cheers,

Daan

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1  
From a 'clean code'-perspective, it's better to make a parameterizeable listener class and create however many instances you need. On the downside, that creates a lot more garbage collector load and some more method dispatch. Your current approach avoids that, so it's more efficient in CPU and memory. However powerful smartphones are these days, they're still resource constrained devices (the battery if nothing else). If the body of each case clause is one or two lines, I'd say the code is fine. It may not be the cleanest, but it's very fit for purpose. –  Barend Apr 14 '13 at 10:25
    
as Barend says, if there are just one or two code lines for each case it will be the best way.. the checking for which button was pressed in this case is O(1) .. better than a for loop –  Elior Apr 14 '13 at 10:28

1 Answer 1

You could set attribute tagof your buttons with the id of the TextViewto be modified. Then, you can retrieve the int value of TextView resource id like this.-

int textResId = getResources().getIdentifier(v.getTag().toString(), "id", getPackageName());

Getting rid of the whole case sentences, so your code looked like.-

public void plusEditTexts(View v) {
    int textResId = getResources().getIdentifier(v.getTag().toString(), "id", getPackageName());
    EditText editText = (EditText) findViewById(textResId);
    // Do your EditText stuff
}

public void minEditTexts(View v) {
    int textResId = getResources().getIdentifier(v.getTag().toString(), "id", getPackageName());
    EditText editText = (EditText) findViewById(textResId);
    // Do your EditText stuff
}
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