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I want to pass two different arguments to my script and based on the sent argument, I need my script does something.But I don't know how to define my conditional statement.

To be more precise, I want my script does searching when I pass "search" argument and alternatively showing the result when I pass "show" argument.

Here is my code:

if ($argc > 1) {
  if ($argv[0] == 'show') {
    for ($i = 0; $i <= $argv[2]; $i++) {
      //do something
    }
  }
  elseif($argv[0] == 'search') {
    //do something
  }
} else {
  echo "no argument passed\n";
}

The "IF" statement is not checking my passing argument whether it is "search" or "show"

share|improve this question
    
try to use else if. –  Gunslinger_ Apr 14 '13 at 11:39
    
That also does not work. –  Babak Khoramdin Apr 14 '13 at 11:40
2  
Isn't $argv[0] the script name? –  Aydin Hassan Apr 14 '13 at 11:41
    
how you execute this program in command line ? –  Gunslinger_ Apr 14 '13 at 11:41
1  
aydin-hassan is right, $argv[0] contains the name of script. You should check $argv[1] for first argument value. –  zavg Apr 14 '13 at 11:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$argv[0] is the name of the script, that's why your code doesn't work.

If I have a file script.php:

<?php
if ($argc > 1) {
  if ($argv[1] == 'show') {
    for ($i = 0; $i <= $argv[2]; $i++) {
      print "show passed\n";
    }
  }
  elseif($argv[1] == 'search') {
    print "search passed";
  }
} else {
  echo "no argument passed\n";
}

Testing gives:

$php script.php

no argument passed

$php script.php search

search passed

$php script.php show 2

show passed
show passed
show passed
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much mate :) –  Babak Khoramdin Apr 14 '13 at 13:23
    
@BabakKhoramdin :) –  user4035 Apr 14 '13 at 14:05

I'd use switch/case instead and your condition ($argc) is wrong as you you need action name and argument and $argv[0] is script name, so your command is argv[1] and its arguments argv[2] and up. I'd also get argc/argv from $_SERVER global

if ($_SERVER['argc'] >= 3) {
  switch( $_SERVER['argv'][1] ) {
     case 'show':
        ...
        break;

     case 'search':
        ...
        break;
   }
} else {
   // no args case
}
share|improve this answer

Try $argv[1] instead

http://php.net/manual/en/reserved.variables.argv.php

$argv[0] contains the name of the script which was called

share|improve this answer

Use $argv[1].

In UNIX model (like...C), the traditional ARGV array starts with the first binary invoked, then passes along the arguments. In PHP case, if you call your script through PHP ("php script.php") instead of hash-banging it ("./script.php"), php automatically removes itself from $argv[0].

So in your case:

$ cat argv.php
#!/usr/bin/php
<?php
    print_r($argv);
?>
$ php argv.php search
Array
(
    [0] => argv.php
    [1] => search
)
$ ./argv.php search
Array
(
    [0] => ./argv.php
    [1] => search
)
$
share|improve this answer

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