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I have a GAE/J app using JDO on top of the Datastore and I've been able to paginate query results using cursors. The default implementation is something we call startCursor in my team (i.e give me results starting from this point). What I want now is something we call endCursor (i.e give me results from the beginning up to this point). Imagine some sort of Twitter timeline (one which does not support PUSH) where clients have to poll some server for fresh content. Lets now imagine that the client fetched some data 5 minutes ago; this data represents the beginning (at 5 minutes ago) up to a point with cursor "X". Now the client wants to update the timeline, this means the client wants to pull fresh content from now up to the beginning at 5 minutes ago. How can this be achieved on GAE/J - JDO?

[edit:] Imagine there are 1000 entities in the store ordered by timestamp. Then I fetched the first 20. After then, 7 new entities got created. How do I retrieve just those new 7 entities using a query?

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Change the ORDER so things are descending perhaps

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Imagine there are 1000 entities in the store ordered by timestamp. Then I fetched the first 20. After then, 7 new entities got created. How do I retrieve just those new 7 in a query? Manipulating the ORDER obviously won't solve this. – Sayo Oladeji Apr 15 '13 at 15:47
    
the only way to do a query "from this point" is to know "the point", and put it in the filter (like highest id or timestamp depends on the class). The O/P is unclear so suggest your clarification goes in there – DataNucleus Apr 15 '13 at 15:51

Set the query ordering to be in timestamp ascending. When you retrieve your query results up to 5 minutes ago (X), obtain and save the cursor.

Later, run the same query using this cursor: items after point X can be retrieved.

(How can this principle be different from how you already use cursors?)

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Cool. I understand what you mean. But now given that I have more than 40,000 entities (and increasing rapidly), I'm not sure it'll be efficient to read all up (in ascending order) until I reach the bottom 20 and then save the cursor. Both runtime and cost efficiency would be affected and I don't know if it'll be possible to pull 100,000 entities (just to obtain a cursor for reuse) in the 30-second timeframe imposed by AppEngine. Or am I missing something? – Sayo Oladeji Apr 16 '13 at 20:27
    
I do not think that I understand your scenario properly. However.... @DataNucleus has a point. You might need two queries with different ordering by time-stamp: one ascending and one descending. Each query will need its own cursor. Each query must be run without a cursor in order to generate an initial one. Each generated query cursor can be saved and then used for subsequent queries, and the resultant query cursor saved instead. Does this help? – Ian Marshall Apr 17 '13 at 12:31

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