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I have a traits class which defines types for "ranges" (or containers, sequences) by deducing the type of member functions, like this:

template<class R>
struct range_type_traits
{
    // "iterator": The type of the iterators of a range
    using iterator = decltype(std::begin(std::declval<R>()));

    // "value_type": The (non-reference) type of the values of a range
    using value_type = typename std::remove_reference<decltype(*(std::declval<iterator>()))>::type;
};

The reason I do this (and not using the subtypes of R directly or std::iterator_traits) is to support any type of container in some templated library that has a begin() member and doesn't require the container to have some value_type / iterator types defined. As far as I know, std::iterator_traits can't handle some kind of "key type" for containers which don't expose their iterator interface to STL using pairs, like std::map does (example: QMap<K,T> has value_type = T. You can access the key via iterator::key().).

Now I want to conditionally define a type key_type iif the iterator has a function ::key() const and take its return type, similar to what I do with the value_type. If I just put the definition in the existing traits class, compilation fails for containers not supporting this.

SFINAE with std::enable_if can conditionally enable template functions. How to conditionally extend an existing class / conditionally define a sub-type?

Something like this sketch:

template<class R>
struct range_type_traits
{
    // "iterator": The type of the iterators of a range
    using iterator = decltype(std::begin(std::declval<R>()));

    // "value_type": The (non-reference) type of the values of a range
    using value_type = typename std::remove_reference<decltype(*(std::declval<iterator>()))>::type;

    ENABLE_IF_COMPILATION_DOES_NOT_FAIL {
        // "key_type": The (non-reference) type of the keys of an associative range not using pairs in its STL-interface
        using key_type = typename std::remove_reference<decltype(std::declval<iterator>().key())>::type;
    }
};
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use SFINAE on class templates to create a base class template that defines key_type if and only if the condition you require is satisfied:

namespace detail
{

    // Primary template (does not define key_type)
    template<typename R, typename = void>
    struct key_type_definer { };

    // Specialization using SFINAE to check for the existence of key() const
    // (does define key_type)
    template<typename R>
    struct key_type_definer<
        R,
        typename std::enable_if<
            std::is_same<
                decltype(std::declval<R const>().key()),
                decltype(std::declval<R const>().key())
                >::value
            >::type
        >
    {
        // Type alias definition
        using key_type = typename std::remove_reference<
            decltype(std::declval<R const>().key())
            >::type;
    };

} // end namespace detail

Then, you could derive your range_traits class template from the key_type_definer class template, this way:

template<class R>
struct range_type_traits : detail::key_type_definer<R>
//                       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
{
    // ...
};

range_type_traits will now define a type alias called key_type if and only if R has a member function R key() const, where R will be the type aliased by key_type.

share|improve this answer
    
Give me a second to try this out. Might take a while, I'm just learning type traits, SFINAE, enable_if, etc. Thanks in advance. ;) –  leemes Apr 14 '13 at 13:38
1  
@leemes: Of course, I understand ;) –  Andy Prowl Apr 14 '13 at 13:41
    
It seems to work (after changing R in the inheritance to the iterator type of R, since key() is defined on the iterator, not on R itself). But I don't understand why my solution fails. Let me show you my approach, maybe you can tell my what's wrong: ideone.com/LJnRQ3 -- Any tips on how to "debug" such stuff? It really sucks to guess things until it works, if you know what I mean... –  leemes Apr 14 '13 at 13:57
2  
Nice answer, as usual. I just want to mention a simplification. Define the primary template by template<typename R, typename = int> struct key_type_definer { }; and the specialization by template<typename R> struct key_type_definer<R, decltype(std::declval<R const>().key(), 0)> { /* same as before */ }. Sorry for putting "lots" of code in a comment but I don't think this is worth an answer on its own. –  Cassio Neri Apr 14 '13 at 13:59
1  
My final solution: ideone.com/DyoebO -- Thank you both, also @CassioNeri for the cleaner syntax without enable_if thanks to the new decltype. Very nice. ;) –  leemes Apr 14 '13 at 14:23

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