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I'm tracking a subject's gaze over a specified area of a computer screen. I'm constructing gaze heatmaps using pyplot's hist2d function.

Here's a simple example:

figure()
hist2d(xval, yval, bins=1000)
xlim([-6, 6])
ylim([-4.5, 4.5])

enter image description here

As you can see, there is a significant area outside of the range of my data. However, I would like to set this area to the blue indicative of a zero-value.

My first attempt using imshow can be seen here:

figure()
imshow(np.array([[0] * 8] * 12), extent=[-6, 6, -4.5, 4.5])
hist2d(xval, yval, bins=1000)
xlim([-6, 6])
ylim([-4.5, 4.5])

enter image description here

This sort of works, but leaves an ugly vertical line at the boundary of my data's range.

My questions are as follows:

  1. Is there a way to fill the figure with the zero-value blue while avoiding the imshow call
  2. If not, how can I hide the vertical line?
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White area is intentional because no data is essentially null, not 0. I think the best solution would be to extend the data you are plotting. –  sashkello Apr 14 '13 at 13:23
    
@sashkello, yes, I realize the white area is null, hence my question. I don't see how I could extend the data without denaturing it. My question is, "how do I extend it". –  blz Apr 14 '13 at 13:28
    
If it is a question of visualization, I don't see a point in getting into much trouble with it - just have a temporary modified data set for plotting. –  sashkello Apr 14 '13 at 13:31
    
@shashkello, I understand, but my problem is that I don't see how I would go about modifying the dataset. Histograms count occurrences of data, so in order for there to be a zero-value, there needs to not be data. I believe that hist2d whites out all coordinates outside of the maximum value in each dimension. In the meantime, I've figured it out. I need only mess with the range kwarg. –  blz Apr 14 '13 at 13:36
    
Nice one, mate! –  sashkello Apr 14 '13 at 13:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, I've figured it out. It's actually rather simple: one just needs to manipulate the range kwarg.

figure()
#imshow(np.array([[0] * 8] * 12), extent=[-6, 6, -4.5, 4.5])
hist2d(xval, yval, bins=1000, range=np.array([(-6, 6), (-4.5, 4.5)]))
xlim([-6, 6])
ylim([-4.5, 4.5])

enter image description here

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