Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code retrieves lines of a log file and tries to find a date in one of delimited fields. Which char is the delimiter can vary and also in what field the date can be found varies. It can also be written in different date formats or as elapsed milliseconds from Unix epoch time. It starts from the bottom of the list and if not found moves it's way up recursively until there are no more lines to read. So the most easiest and the most readable way to do this (in my opinion) is by using nested try-catch blocks, but given that it's also a recursive method should in theory give lower performance? Is this a bad code?

I can use bunch of if-else blocks together with DateTime.TryParse with additional variables for result, but that would make my eyes bleed. Does readability of code justify nested try-catch blocks for flow control?

static DateTime? Search(List<string> lines)
{
    if (lines.Count == 0)
    {
        return null;
    }

    DateTime? date = null;
    string dateField;

    try
    {
        dateField = lines.Last().Split(';')[18].Trim('\'').Trim();
        date = DateTime.ParseExact(dateField, "MM'/'dd'/'yy HH:mm:ss", null, DateTimeStyles.AllowWhiteSpaces);
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        try
        {
            dateField = lines.Last().Split(';')[19].Trim('\'').Trim();
            date = DateTime.ParseExact(dateField, "MM'/'dd'/'yy HH:mm:ss", null, DateTimeStyles.AllowWhiteSpaces);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            try
            {
                dateField = lines.Last().Split(':')[9].Split('=')[1].Trim();
                date = FromUnixEpochTime(long.Parse(dateField));
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                try
                {
                    dateField = lines.Last().Split(':')[12].Split('=')[1].Trim();
                    date = FromUnixEpochTime(long.Parse(dateField));
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        dateField = lines.Last().Split(':')[19].Trim('\'').Trim();
                        date = DateTime.ParseExact(dateField, "MM'/'dd'/'yy HH", null, DateTimeStyles.AllowWhiteSpaces);
                    }
                    catch (Exception)
                    {
                        lines.RemoveAt(lines.Count - 1);
                        date = Search(lines);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return date;
}
share|improve this question
    
First of all, you shouldn't catch general exception types, like Exception –  MarcinJuraszek Apr 14 '13 at 14:24
2  
You really should consider looking into TryParse and TryParseExact, which will alleviate much of your exception worries. –  Jim Mischel Apr 14 '13 at 14:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know you'd ruled them out, but I'd go with

TryParse

and

TryParseExact 

(although AFAIK internally they just use try-catch.. but your code becomes much more readable)

I'd borrow the idea behind TryParse etc. and do something along the lines of .. (see below)

I think this style separates out each strategy and makes it more maintainable as there is less 'noise' (i.e. the exception catching) around each strategy

(I've allowed duplication in the example strategies but some of that could be re-factored out as well)

cheers

Stu

static DateTime? Search(List<string> lines)
{
    if (lines.Count == 0)
    {
        return null;
    }

    DateTime parsedDate;

    // the first successful strategy will 'short circuit' the rest so they don't run
    if(TryGetDateStrategy1(lines, out parsedDate)
        || TryGetDateStrategy2(lines, out parsedDate)
        || etc. etc.) 
    {
        return parsedDate;
    }
    return null;
}

private static bool TryGetDateStrategy1(List<string> lines, out DateTime? date)
{
    var dateField = lines.Last().Split(';')[19].Trim('\'').Trim();
    DateTime parsedDate;
    if (DateTime.TryParseExact(dateField, "MM'/'dd'/'yy HH:mm:ss", null, DateTimeStyles.AllowWhiteSpaces,out date))
    {
        date = parsedDate;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
private static bool  TryGetDateStrategy2(List<string> lines, out DateTime? date)
{
    var dateField = lines.Last().Split(';')[18].Trim('\'').Trim();
    DateTime parsedDate;
    if (DateTime.TryParseExact(dateField, "MM'/'dd'/'yy HH:mm:ss", null, DateTimeStyles.AllowWhiteSpaces, out date))
    {
        date = parsedDate;
        return true;
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great suggestion! I think I'll pick your way. Thank you! –  dakt Apr 14 '13 at 15:05

You should never throw exceptions when you are intending to handle the code in the same section. This makes debugging with exceptions turned on a nightmare. My suggestion would be to have a main method that calls sub methods to try each type - and if the value is not what you expect - move to the next one.

    public DateTime? GetValue()
    {
        DateTime? value = null;

        // Regular way
        value = GetValueImpl1();

        if (value != null)
            return value;

        // Fall back 1
        value = GetValueImpl2();
        if (value != null)
            return value;

        // Fall back 2
        value = GetValueImpl3();
        if (value != null)
            return value;
        return null;
    }
    private DateTime? GetValueImpl1()
    {
        return new DateTime();
    }
    private DateTime? GetValueImpl2()
    {
        return new DateTime();
    }
    private DateTime? GetValueImpl3()
    {
        return new DateTime();
    }
share|improve this answer

Exceptions are meant for "exceptional" cases. They have bad performance times since they are handled differently than normal code. There are a lot of explanations on-line which explain why exceptions slow down the code.

using the tryParse method to check if your data is a date and then using if then else statements would be more efficient and arguably more concise and readable.

Also use string constants instead of typing the date format again. This produces code which is harder to maintain.

As an after thought you can use just if statements :

if (tryParse(...)){
   return Parse(...);
}

if (tryParse(...)){
   return Parse(...);
}

return null;

This would be the most readable without nesting and can be commented in a more readable manner

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you parsing it twice? This can lead to performance bottle necks especially in tight loops. If tryparse {return value parsed out of tryparse method}. –  tsells Apr 14 '13 at 15:05
    
@Geek there are a bunch of different strings tested for dates, each if loop represents a test for one of them. (basically un- nesting the original structure) –  Osama Javed Apr 14 '13 at 15:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.